TEMPO CALENDAR
Tempo's Taos Talent 2020
Bear Marcus aka emcee B3ar. Courtesy Bear Marcus

Calling all Taos County creatives! Make a video!

The Taos News and Tempo are asking that you videotape yourself doing what you do; draw a line, spin your wheel, throw paint, blow your horn, strum that guitar or banjo, make your voice or violin sing, slam that poem or read that story in progress. Post it to YouTube or TikTok and share the link with us! This is open to anyone in Taos County and the Enchanted Circle.
Long Chain On by David Garver
TAOS TALENT

Long Chain On by David Garver

Long Chain On by David Garver
My name is Rivers Picasso Martinez  I am 12 years old  I attend TISA    The video is entitled:    "When You Level Up"    I made it with my family.    I enjoy playing video games
TAOS TALENT

When You Level Up: 12 Year Old Rivers Picasso Martinez enjoys playing video games

My name is Rivers Picasso Martinez I am 12 years old I attend TISA The video is entitled: "When You Level Up" I made it with my family. I enjoy playing video games
6th-Grader Elijah Russell plays cover of London Bridges by Green Day  My name is Elijah Russell. I am a 6th grader at TISA. During this quarantine I have really been practicing my guitar skills.  My favorite band is Green Day and my friends and I have a band called " A Rainy Sunny Day"  I was proud of London Bridges because I was just playing around on the guitar and listening to the sounds and   was able to put London Bridges together by sounding it out.
TAOS TALENT

6th-Grader Elijah Russell plays cover of London Bridges by Green Day

My name is Elijah Russell. I am a 6th grader at TISA. During this quarantine I have really been practicing my guitar skills. My favorite band is Green Day and my friends and I have a band called " A Rainy Sunny Day" I was proud of London Bridges because I was just playing around on the guitar and listening to the sounds and was able to put London Bridges together by sounding it out.
2020 Taos Talent: Painting demonstration submitted by Eliana Kaysing
TAOS TALENT

Painting demonstration by Eliana Kaysing

2020 Taos Talent: Painting demonstration by Eliana Kaysing
Elsie Clayton, live drawing demonstration
TAOS TALENT

Elsie Clayton: I love to draw

Elsie Clayton shares her drawing process in this live stop motion demonstration. Our latest Taos Talent 2020 video submission!
@abigailtaos09    This is for school
TAOS TALENT

Dance video from AbigailTaos09

Abigailtaos09 shares her adorable TikTok dance videos with the Taos News. Another wonderful submission to Taos Talent! @abigailtaos09 This is for school
7th-grade student Brooklyn shares her love of filmmaking in this impressive Taos Talent 2020 video submission.  A must-see!
TAOS TALENT

Filming is my life!

7th-grade student Brooklyn shares her love of filmmaking in this impressive Taos Talent 2020 video submission. A must-see!

Cosmic Hop

A funky, trippy cool instrumental submitted by Laguna Menta:

Sheltering In

Tenney Whedon Walsh shares some music she wrote for these times:

Pastels

Margaret Nes  sent this in, combining some of her artwork and piano music: 
Tempo Arts
Courtesy Holly Sievers'Two Butterflies'

Emergence from lockdown

Taos' new normal is happening apace - small retail shops opening here and there - but all with new precautionary measures. Two Graces Gallery, for instance, opened quietly Tuesday (May 26) and plans a more official open-door policy June 1 - assuming Gov. Lujan Grisham doesn't change plans.
Courtesy Zoe ZimmermanHeavy metal and tulips.

Jeweler Maria Samora stays close to home

Maria Samora is one of the most well-known, contemporary Native American jewelers. Since winning first place at the Santa Fe Indian Market in 2005, she went on to win again in 2007 and in 2009. She was the poster child for Indian Market that year - the first jeweler ever. Since then, her jewelry has become highly coveted by influencers and collectors. Her designs are inspired by Pueblo Indian tradition but are elegant and timeless in their minimalist simplicity.
Courtesy photoWire chandeliers have become a Marianne Fahrney calling card.

An intimate portrait of an artist and mother in lockdown

"The thing is I don't really feel like an artist," said Marianne Farhney as we walked together sharing the wide width of a dirt road in El Prado. Marianne Farhney is a local artist who arrived in Taos shortly after graduating from the San Franscico Art School with a BA in Fine Art in 2004. The bio on her website simply states "(She) was born in Washington, D.C. and raised in the D.C. area. She has been creating, making and crafting for as long as she can remember."
Courtesy Anita RodriguezThe title on the ribbon says: 'Curaron con copal, yerbas, agua, familia, comunidad y amor' - 'They healed with copal, herbs, water, family, community and love.'

Family, community and love

The Spanish flu swept through Taos 102 years ago and a curandera named Maggie Mascareñas saved many lives. She lived in Cañón when I knew her in the 1970s and she was already old. Back then I was an enjarradora, a traditional mud plasterer, and I did adobe restoration jobs. I was working on a very old building whose owner hired me on condition I put a certain relative on the job. I soon realized why. Nobody else would ever have hired him - I found beer cans in the straw. He got on his horse during the lunch hour one day, drunk, and got bucked off.
Courtesy photoTree Menane of Heritage Fine Arts hands a $1,950 check to Marci Lameman on April 28.

Galleries do their part

Heritage Fine Arts just handed a $1,950 check last week (April 28) to Marci Lameman, sister of well-known Diné/Navajo artist Andersen Kee. The check is the first of more hoped-for assistance to aid folks in dire circumstances in Navajo Nation - many of whom are elderly or without electricity or running water - who are especially at risk during this current coronavirus pandemic.
Courtesy 203 Fineart'Terrace' by Tom Dixon: 'My paintings change every day and every hour - it's all about composing something great to deconstruct.'

'Working toward resolution'

Tom Dixon may well be the most "underappreciated artist around," as his friend and fellow painter Peter Parks notes, but he is also one of the most respected and collected contemporary artists in Taos.
Courtesy Janie RomerManuel's signature hat crowns every outfit.

Love your clothes

Normally an April article on fashion would be an enthusiastic look at the new colors and trends arriving in the stores for the new season. Instead, it's refreshing to be taking an entirely different approach to the seasonal wardrobe.
Courtesy Bill Curry'Corn Maiden' stands sentinel beside Taos Blue's front door, at 101 Bent Street.

Virtual realities

Going digital or giving up altogether are the choices facing art galleries and small businesses in Taos, and the world for that matter, while we all wait out the lockdowns caused by the pandemic of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).
Courtesy Anita Rodriguez'The Water Protector'

Archetypes are prophetic

I painted this in 2016 and it isn't the first painting that seemed to be eerily prophetic. Kurt Vonnegut says artists are like the canaries miners used to take underground to warn them of poisonous gasses humans can't detect.
They have raised $10,000,000—enough to provide 100 artists with $5,000 relief grants each week between now and September.

Artist Relief funds 100 artists each week between now and September

Artist Relief, a new coalition of national arts grantmakers came together three weeks ago to protect the country’s artists in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. They have raised $10,000,000—enough to provide 100 artists with $5,000 relief grants each week between now and September.
Most conversations these days do not begin with bright words. Words like hopeful, transformation and opportunity are all mostly nostalgic reminders of days gone by.
Tempo

The Paseo looks forward

Most conversations these  days do not begin with bright words. Words like hopeful, transformation and opportunity are all mostly nostalgic reminders of days gone by.
file photo: Maye Torres was born in Taos in 1960. Her father was a rural science educator and the family lived in El Salvador, Ecuador and Bolivia, where Torres was exposed to the lives of the Incan, Mayan and Aztec people, their art and concepts, as well as Old Spanish and European cultures. During the past 30 years, she has worked as a professional artist, and her art continues to be an exploration of global ideas from science to politics, mythology to social media and cosmology to human emotion.

A time to make art: 'We can start a renaissance'

There's long been talk of an art renaissance in Taos. It seems counterintuitive when isolation is the mantra, and everything is closed. Taos artist Máye Torres said she thinks the time is ripe.
Courtesy photo'To the Sky' - oil on canvas by Norlynne Coar

Beneath the stillness, life: how lockdown affects Taos artists

How self-imposed quarantine affects artists is something Tempo was wondering last week: how they're dealing with the self-imposed solitude and how different that solitude is from their normal creative space.
Courtesy photoHayden in her new studio in Lower Las Colonias - offering 'plenty of opportunity for social-distancing photography.'

Photographer adapts to 'new world'

Exciting is how Taos photographer Kathryn Hayden describes her new world post-isolation. Originally located on Kit Carson Road, Hayden bought property in Lower Las Colonias, and during self-isolation set up her home and new studio there, where she's been busy painting, installing lighting and scouting locations for outdoor photo shoots on her property.
Tempo Music
Courtesy photoJohnny Blueheart's new outing was inspired by his time in isolation at Ghost Ranch in Abiquiú.

Desert Muse Johnny Blueheart releases 'On the Loose'

Johnny Blueheart's debut EP starts out with a traveling song - a fitting choice for a musician whose life has been redefined in many ways by a catalyzing journey. Blueheart comes from the suburbs of New York City and grew up working on his family's Willow Ridge Farm, a 32-acre farm in the Hudson Valley. Blueheart when on to work as a cinematographer and singer before he pushed the pause button on his life's trajectory and took a trip out West to camp, wander and reflect.
Courtesy photoThe Swing Dusters play at the Sagebrush Inn before the pandemic set in.

Best cover song

Robert Parsons formed the Swing Dusters as a dance band specializing in Western swing classics and standards from the American songbook. This January the Swing Dusters held a CD release party for their first album, "That's Your Red Wagon." One of the songs from that CD has been nominated for New Mexico Music Awards Best Cover Song.
Courtesy photoJackson Price bids Taos a fond farewell.

Jackson Price's swan song for Taos

Jackson Price has been a fixture on the Taos music scene for more than a decade. Price came to Taos from Los Angeles, California, where he spent 15 years doing bit parts in movies, guest spots on TV shows and commercials. After playing lead guitar in a Los Angeles-based blues band called the Mighty Mojo Prophets, he decided to move his family to New Mexico.
Courtesy photoKit Carson Park goes dark with the absence of any big music events this summer.

The sound of silence

Taos in summer is a living pageant of near weekly concerts and events, centered around Kit Carson Park. This summer, of course, will be different. Town Manager Rick Bellis said, "Nothing is happening till at least Labor Day."
Courtesy photoTheater's are dark, but plans to reopen under new guidelines are underway

Gone dark, not dead

"One day I was rehearsing, sewing, set designing and building, and the next day my calendar was blank." These are the words of Kristen Woolf, director, actor, set designer, trained opera singer and performer. When recognition of the onslaught of the coronavirus pandemic hit, she was mid-sentence directing Edward Albee's "Seascape" for Taos Onstage. "I had a wonderful cast and we were a few weeks into rehearsal, planning to open mid-April 2020. I was also doing the sets and the costumes."
Courtesy Blue GaborSinger-songwriter Max Gomez takes it to the WWW.

Americana artist Max Gomez recalibrates

Americana singer-songwriter Max Gomez spoke to Tempo recently from his home in Los Angeles about how the coronavirus pandemic has affected his life and plans. Originally from Taos, Gomez splits his time between the City of Angels and his hometown when he isn't out on the road. Gomez has been billed opposite musicians such as Shawn Mullins, James McMurtry, Buddy Miller, Jim Lauderdale, Patty Griffin and John Hiatt.
By now, the reality of the COVID-19 pandemic has sunk in. We are in this for the long haul.    This article is devoted to highlighting some of the resources that are available to musicians who have been negatively impacted by the coronavirus crisis.

In the nick of time: Resources for musicians

By now, the reality of the COVID-19 pandemic has sunk in. We are in this for the long haul. This article is devoted to highlighting some of the resources that are available to musicians who have been negatively impacted by the coronavirus crisis.
Courtesy Blue Gabor Max Gomez goes digital to bring his songs to you this weekend.

Max Gomez celebrates his birthday with online concerts

Join Americana singer-songwriter Max Gomez this coming Saturday (April 25) and Monday (April 27) as he broadcasts two special online concerts from his home to yours. Gomez grew up in Taos, but is now based in Los Angeles. He tours nationally and has been billed opposite musicians such as Shawn Mullins, James McMurtry, Buddy Miller, Jim Lauderdale, Patty Griffin and John Hiatt.
Maria Drove a Mustang  Written and performed by David Garver. Recorded mixed and mastered by Greg Thum in Taos New Mexico. First single and video from the EP ILLINOIS. Go to davidmgarver.com for more info and music.

David Garver: Maria Drove a Mustang

Written and performed by David Garver. Recorded mixed and mastered by Greg Thum in Taos New Mexico. First single and video from the EP ILLINOIS. Go to davidmgarver.com for more info and music.
Courtesy photo Lady Gaga recruits all – your faves for this global event online on Saturday (April 18), a benefit for front-line health care workers and the World Health Organization.

'One World: Together at Home'

Cynthia Freeman-Valerio, who had to postpone her much-loved Night of 1,000 Stars event due to COVID-19, shared this wonderful free online event with Tempo – a musical special to support front-line health care workers and the World Health Organization.
Courtesy photo Robby Romero gets his hands in the Earth.

Taos resident and environmental activist Robby Romero participates in Earth Day Live

Earth Day Live has released the lineup for its three-day live streaming event online. Political and cultural leaders from all over will participate in the event, which is being hosted from April 22-24 to coincide with the 50th anniversary of Earth Day.
Kanizzle (Joshua Cunningham) and Beat Kitty, captured in easier times, stay connected in lockdown

Music in the time of corona: An opportunity for musicians to focus, record, grow

Like musicians everywhere, those in Taos find themselves suddenly unemployed and at home. Here's what they're doing with themselves:
Courtesy imageJoanne Forman's recent work choral work, 'A Corridor of Bones,' concerns a young widow and her little daughter in a stroller who set out from Central America to walk to the United States.
Tempo

Composer Joanne Forman explores moral questions of the day

While most of us are getting used to social distancing and staying at home in response to the global coronavirus pandemic, Joanne Forman said she hasn't noticed much of a change in her daily life. The Taos composer is used to spending most of her time at home, and she is keeping to her regular routine.
Courtesy photoJulie Greer plans to pair up with fellow singer-songwriter Jennifer Peterson to make digital magic during lockdown.

Keeping music alive online

It's a different world than last week, and by the time you read these words, more will have changed as we take active steps to ward off the common threat of a microscopic virus, and the isolation that comes with it.
Tempo Culture
Courtesy Patricia MichaelsWatercolor by the designer

Patricia Michaels makes more than masks

Patricia Michaels is not just a Taos Treasure; she achieved worldwide fame as a fashion designer when she was the runner-up on "Project Runway's" Season 11. Since then Michaels has gone on to win many awards, including one from the Smithsonian Institution. Last year, she was commissioned to participate in "A Seat at the Table" installation at the Edward Kennedy Institute in Massachusetts, where she designed the chair for New Mexico's first Native congresswoman, Deb Haaland.
Stargazer: June 4-10

Stargazer: June 4 - 10, 2020

You're all alone on a gravelly path when something stirs in the fields ahead. Read the latest intuitions for Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, Leo, Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarius, Capricorn, Aquarius, and Pisces!
Courtesy Zoe ZimmermanHeavy metal and tulips.

Jeweler Maria Samora stays close to home

Maria Samora is one of the most well-known, contemporary Native American jewelers. Since winning first place at the Santa Fe Indian Market in 2005, she went on to win again in 2007 and in 2009. She was the poster child for Indian Market that year - the first jeweler ever. Since then, her jewelry has become highly coveted by influencers and collectors. Her designs are inspired by Pueblo Indian tradition but are elegant and timeless in their minimalist simplicity.
Courtesy photoHula-hooping is a great way to exercise and have fun with the kiddos - and it's easy to make your own.

Hula-hoop happy hours

It was a strange end to a very strange school year, with kids missing out on all the usual in-person festivities like graduations, field trips, field days and yearbook signings. We applaud all the creative efforts of schools to re-create these opportunities for students - from ice-cream Zoom parties to balloon-decorated drive-bys. Taos High did a great job of commemorating the class of 2020 and every school made sure students got to celebrate and say goodbye to classmates before heading off into a summer of unknowns.
Courtesy Bill Curry Inside Twirl, on Camino de la Placita

Twirl locks down longer

When New Mexico went on lockdown, Tempo invited Twirl to contribute a weekly column while schools were closed, geared toward helping families keep their children occupied in quarantine.
Courtesy photoOne person's trash is often another person's treasure.

The Bermuda Triangle of your clutter

Do you have a closet, storage shed, garage or even an entire house that has turned into a Bermuda Triangle for clutter? Ronald Usherwood has answers. He owns Taos Estate Sales. His life's work is helping people liquidate, downsize and close estates. Tempo asked him a few questions about how it works. Here are his edited answers.
Courtesy photoKids are encouraged to get outside.

Roots and Wings for Twirl

Each Friday during the school year I share with staff, volunteers, nonprofits and contracted personnel who work with our students at Roots and Wings Community School a communication titled "Solid Roots, Fluttering Wings," which reviews the past week and previews the coming week. The goal is to reflect on challenges and to celebrate successes, while preparing to deliver a richer educational experience for our students and a more gratifying professional experience for our educators in the weeks ahead. What it means to be "solidly grounded" or "fluttering with enthusiasm" has changed significantly in the last two months.
Salon X prepares for the new normal.Courtesy photo

When vanity trumps fear

The missive from Salon X in Tempo's mailbox alerted us to the fact that it was time to start thinking about hair trims and other seemingly frivolous matters.
Courtesy Anee WardSeco Live re-imagined.

Sanctuary: An Online Studio Tour Film Festival

With the lockdown having shut down the town, from music venues to art galleries, theaters to parks, we are witnessing a virtual boom on the web. The folks at Seco Live have also been hard at work online this spring, creating digital opportunities to support the artistic community in Taos.
Courtesy Bill CurryForest bathing beneath a canopy of green

Mother's Day virtually

With Mother's Day upon us, we've curated an issue dedicated to all the mothers who are experiencing "COVID fatigue," a real malady, if not as dangerous as the virus itself.
Courtesy Anita RodriguezThe title on the ribbon says: 'Curaron con copal, yerbas, agua, familia, comunidad y amor' - 'They healed with copal, herbs, water, family, community and love.'

Family, community and love

The Spanish flu swept through Taos 102 years ago and a curandera named Maggie Mascareñas saved many lives. She lived in Cañón when I knew her in the 1970s and she was already old. Back then I was an enjarradora, a traditional mud plasterer, and I did adobe restoration jobs. I was working on a very old building whose owner hired me on condition I put a certain relative on the job. I soon realized why. Nobody else would ever have hired him - I found beer cans in the straw. He got on his horse during the lunch hour one day, drunk, and got bucked off.
Courtesy photoCreating sanctuary at home - yet for victims of domestic violence, home is somewhere to escape from, not shelter in.

Sanctuary lost

Our house sits surrounded by fruit trees, on two quiet acres with a spectacular view of the mountains. It's large enough that its two, sometimes four, occupants don't feel crowded but not too large that some rooms are superfluous. The decor reminds one friend of a Bedouin tent. It's not without its problems. The man who built it consulted neither an architect nor his wife when designing it, nor did he think to put space for a refrigerator in the kitchen, and the living room is weirdly narrow.
Courtesy photoTaos-raised actor, writer, director, producer and poet Arron Shiver muses on life under lockdown in LA.

Arron Shiver unmasked

Arron Shiver was born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 40 some years ago, and spent a great deal of his youth in Taos. Here is where he discovered acting quite early on in life at high school with famed Taos High School drama teacher Nancy Jenkins, and in the rich community theater that has long thrived here. He was married for several years, to artist Anaïs Rumfelt (who appears on our cover with their son, Jackson). He has appeared in many motion pictures and television shows, as well as onstage. He lives in Los Angeles but visits often. His mother, Melody Swann, founder of Cowgirls Design, still lives here, and Jackson Shiver splits his time between LA and Taos.
Courtesy photoLise Goett's poetry appears in numerous journals, including The Paris Review.

Of poetry and pandemic

Taos poet and teacher Lise Goett conjures up poetry in response to COVID-19.
Courtesy Zoom screen shot by John Gusdorf From top left, clockwise: Mila Datta, Jesus Rosales, Spyridon Stonn and Anastacia Santistevan.

Young actors take to the screen

Taos Children’s Theater is living proof that the show must and can still go on. In response to the COVID-19 lockdown, director Karen Thibodeau and assistant directors Victoria Ortiz and Christopher Heron developed a Zoom format for rehearsing their current production of "The Dancing Princesses." They envisioned a video possibility for the final production, and then it all came together.
Courtesy photoOne of the most respected Beat writers and acclaimed American poets of his generation, Allen Ginsberg was one of many poets to appear at the Taos Poetry Circus over the decades.

The late, great Taos Poetry Circus

'To be a poet is a condition, not a profession." That quote is attributed to Robert Graves, and if one does in fact have the courage to call oneself a poet, they most probably would agree. It's a heavy weight to bear, and few carry it lightly. So while April (National Poetry Month), draws to a close, we here at Tempo are celebrating all things poesy, and honoring the poets who bring forth the muse's gifts.
Courtesy photoChili Line Depot in Tres Piedras is open for business - takeout. 'Everyone is champing at the bit. We are seeing a few fresh faces, people with quarantine fever who just want to get out and take a drive and a hike. Afterward, they are happy to find us.'

Restaurants reinvent themselves

People still need to eat. Right now in Taos there are restaurants, cafés and food carts facing financial challenges that could make or break them. As a result of the coronavirus pandemic, dine-in is no longer an option.
Tempo is inviting local poets to submit a poem written in lockdown, in writing or on video, for our tribute to National Poetry Month during the last week of April.    Please send to tempo@taosnews.com
Tempo

Calling all poets

Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history, Plato said, and throughout history, words and verses have been used by everyone with a message to share – from lovers, revolutionaries, prisoners and politicians. Poems – and the poets who write them – have a way of uplifting, empowering, sobering and humbling us with only a few lines. The art form's ability to express the things that roil and rage within us is its singular gift.
Most conversations these days do not begin with bright words. Words like hopeful, transformation and opportunity are all mostly nostalgic reminders of days gone by.
Tempo

The Paseo looks forward

Most conversations these  days do not begin with bright words. Words like hopeful, transformation and opportunity are all mostly nostalgic reminders of days gone by.
Tempo Books
Courtesy imageThe cover of 'King of Taos,' a bawdy new novel by Max Evans, the Texas-born author of 'The Rounders,' 'The Hi-Lo Country,' 'Animal Stories' and many others, who lives in Albuquerque.
Book Review

When a quarter could buy you a beer

BOOK REVIEW: THE KING OF TAOS - A novel by Max Evans 176 pp. University of New Mexico Press. $9.99In Max Evans' newest novel, "The King of Taos," readers are taken back in time to Taos in the 1950s,
Courtesy photoLise Goett's poetry appears in numerous journals, including The Paris Review.

Of poetry and pandemic

Taos poet and teacher Lise Goett conjures up poetry in response to COVID-19.
Laure's previous YA works are 'This Raging Light' and 'But Then I Came Back' and this summer's forthcoming 'Mayhem.' She will be published under the Disney umbrella with the 'City of Villains' series next year. Courtesy photo

Big girl jobs and little girl dreams

How any of us wind up anywhere is a mystery. We set out on a path bound for somewhere and arrive in a place we likely did not intend on going at all. The forks in the road aren't always easy to spot, and sometimes we wind up on the low road even though we intended to take the high one. Oftentimes, it is as if the name of the road changes suddenly while upon it.
Courtesy Veronica Golos'In combination with writing, long hikes are a solution for me,' says the poet. 'This combination of movement in beauty, and being in a "poetry head" has led me into a new book.'

In the time of quiet

Veronica Golos is a founding co-editor of the Taos Journal of International Poetry and Art, former poetry editor for the Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion and core faculty at Tupelo Press' Writers Conferences.
Tempo is inviting local poets to submit a poem written in lockdown, in writing or on video, for our tribute to National Poetry Month during the last week of April.    Please send to tempo@taosnews.com
Tempo

Calling all poets

Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history, Plato said, and throughout history, words and verses have been used by everyone with a message to share – from lovers, revolutionaries, prisoners and politicians. Poems – and the poets who write them – have a way of uplifting, empowering, sobering and humbling us with only a few lines. The art form's ability to express the things that roil and rage within us is its singular gift.
Courtesy photo Workshops online through Zoom and other platforms have become the new normal under sequestration.

Memoir workshop creates new virtual model

A memoir workshop in town that transitioned to online meetings on Zoom after the coronavirus pandemic ended the possibility of continuing face-to-face meetings unwittingly created a new virtual model for future workshops and classes offered by the Society of the Muse of the Southwest.

Isolation as springboard for creativity

It was inevitable: the smell of Purell would always remind her of the winter of 2020. Maybe that will be the first line of my novel about life during the great coronavirus pandemic.
Literary lockdown: Books for self-quarantine
Tempo

Literary lockdown

The coronavirus pandemic, the likes of which has not been seen since the Spanish flu of 1918, has swept rapidly across the globe, forcing humans to self-isolate and socially distance. Around the world, people are stuck at home. With no idea how long this might go on for, it's easy to feel panicked and claustrophobic.
Elizabeth BurnsTwo of the books in print by Taos publishers of Twice 5 Miles.

Teaching the stuff nobody teaches you

Along with a zombie apocalypse and being abducted by aliens, one of the top fears people have is public speaking, even actors. The ability to deliver an effective speech or sales pitch and to read from a novel in a way that engages an audience are believed to be talents one is born with.
Courtesy photoLevi Romero came to poetry in a roundabout way, as a listener: 'I think that was the key to things, developing an ear for language and the musicality that exists in language and the ways stories are told.'

New Mexico's first poet laureate: Levi Romero depicts 'the loco to the sublime'

Levi Romero says he used to be a closet poet. Being a poet and a young Chicano male did not seem to go together. That is, until he recognized how much language and the love of stories lay at the heart of both his culture and the art of poetry.
Tempo Film
Photo By Scott KanafaniVietnam Veterans Memorial in Angel Fire

Both sides now

To honor all veterans on Memorial Day, New Mexico Public Broadcast System is airing Albuquerque filmmaker Sarah Kanafani's poignant documentary "On This Hallowed Ground: Vietnam Veterans Memorial Born from Tragedy" on Sunday (May 24) at 10 p.m. and Monday (May 25) at 8 p.m. on Channel 5.1.
Right: A view from isolation in La Mancha.

Locked down in La Mancha

Everything was going as planned. At the end of 2019, I had it all set up. I had sublet my apartment in Taos, and returned to Barcelona for the opportunity of a lifetime - to work on a documentary for Media 3.14, award-winning producers of documentaries like "Comprar, Tirar, Comprar" and "Me Llamo Violeta."
Courtesy photoTheater's are dark, but plans to reopen under new guidelines are underway

Gone dark, not dead

"One day I was rehearsing, sewing, set designing and building, and the next day my calendar was blank." These are the words of Kristen Woolf, director, actor, set designer, trained opera singer and performer. When recognition of the onslaught of the coronavirus pandemic hit, she was mid-sentence directing Edward Albee's "Seascape" for Taos Onstage. "I had a wonderful cast and we were a few weeks into rehearsal, planning to open mid-April 2020. I was also doing the sets and the costumes."
Courtesy photoTaos-raised actor, writer, director, producer and poet Arron Shiver muses on life under lockdown in LA.

Arron Shiver unmasked

Arron Shiver was born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 40 some years ago, and spent a great deal of his youth in Taos. Here is where he discovered acting quite early on in life at high school with famed Taos High School drama teacher Nancy Jenkins, and in the rich community theater that has long thrived here. He was married for several years, to artist Anaïs Rumfelt (who appears on our cover with their son, Jackson). He has appeared in many motion pictures and television shows, as well as onstage. He lives in Los Angeles but visits often. His mother, Melody Swann, founder of Cowgirls Design, still lives here, and Jackson Shiver splits his time between LA and Taos.
Chris Hemsworth, pictured with Rudhraksh Jaiswal, stars in the action thriller, ‘Extraction’ on Netflix.

Streaming now: ‘Extraction’ and ‘Rambo: Last Blood’

Two films now available for streaming — “Extraction” on Netflix and “Rambo: Last Blood” on Amazon Prime —  are two examples of how the lone wolf action hero is depicted.   By Rick …
‘Vitalina Varela’ takes its title from the name of its lead actress.

Streaming now: Vitalina Varela

A film by Pedro Costa titled “Vitalina Varela” (2019) stands out because light is as refined a character as much as the actors, setting and story. Photographed by Leonardo Simões with a masterful use of chiaroscuro that recalls Caravaggio and Rembrandt, the film follows the journey of a Cape Verdean woman as she comes to collect her late husband’s remains in Lisbon, Portugal. 
Courtesy photoOn the April 22 online event, poet James Navé, among others, will present poems and stories that will inspire a deeper appreciation of the natural world.

Celebrating clean air, pure water, sustainable soils

One month ago, Jean Stevens, the director of the annual Taos Environmental Film Festival, canceled the film screenings to be held at the Taos Community Auditorium in response to the state emergency quarantine order for the coronavirus pandemic. Fast forward to Earth Day, April 22, thanks to the determined efforts of Society of the Muse of the Southwest, director Jan Smith and a stunning roster of local actors, poets, musicians and activists, a different, uniquely Taos community-inspired online gathering of artists will speak to these times. All the proceeds from online donations will go to Holy Cross Hospital to provide personal protective equipment for the staff.
Karoline Schuch, Friedrich Mücke and Tilman Döbler in a scene from ‘Balloon.'

Streaming now: ‘Balloon’

It’s easy to forget how desperate people can be when deprived of freedom. Even today, with the world upended by a dangerous pandemic, freedom is often taken for granted in the west. 
Benicio Del Toro and Patricia Arquette appear in a scene from ‘Escape at Dannemora,’ a 2018 series directed by Ben Stiller.

Streaming now: ‘Escape at Dannemora’

It had to happen. Both movie theaters in Taos have closed for the time being in response to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. The Taos Center for the Arts has closed both its Stables Gallery and …
Todd Christensen, the New Mexico Film Office director, in the field.

'Swing the door open wider:' New fund encourages indigenous filmmakers

Taos Pueblo filmmakers interested in developing their media-arts projects are eligible to receive funding through the newly established Senator John Pinto Memorial Filmmakers Fund. Individual Native filmmakers can use funds toward any aspect of production. This can include, film, TV, video games or audio visual projects.

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