Entertainment

What's happening in Taos?

Besides the 4th of July and big concerts in Kit Carson Park, there's still a lot going on

By Tempo staff
tempo@taosnews.com
Posted 7/2/19

While a lot of the activity will no doubt be centered on the 4th of July and the big concerts in Kit Carson Park featuring Los Lobos, WAR ...

You have exceeded your story limit for this 30-day period.

Please log in to continue

Log in
Entertainment

What's happening in Taos?

Besides the 4th of July and big concerts in Kit Carson Park, there's still a lot going on

Posted

While a lot of the activity will no doubt be centered on the 4th of July and the big concerts in Kit Carson Park featuring Los Lobos, WAR and Lake Street Dive, there's still quite a bit going on in Taos County and the Moreno Valley. For more, of course, check out Tempo magazine inside The Taos News — which published early this week, on Wednesday July 3.

No Taos Plaza Live this week

The Taos Plaza Live free concert will not be happening this week because of the numerous 4th of July events happening that day. The concert, sponsored by Taos County Chamber of Commerce businesses and local organizations, will resume its regular Thursday schedule next week with performances by blues artists The Blue Reys and Chicken Sedan from 6-8 p.m. For more information and a full schedule of events through Aug. 22, call (575) 751-8800 or visit taoschamber.com.

Nashville to New Mexico coming to Eagle Nest

Nashville, Tennessee, singer-songwriter Billy Dawson is celebrating his fifth year of bringing together Nashville songwriters and a high-energy evening of acoustic music in the village of Eagle Nest, nestled in the beautiful Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Northern New Mexico. The event is planned Saturday (July 6) at Enchanted Eagle Park, 151 Willow Creek Drive in Eagle Nest. Activities and entertainment will take place throughout the afternoon in the park before the Nashville to New Mexico show starts at 5 p.m. Food, local craft beer and wine vendors will be available. Tickets are $20.

History of the swastika symbol among the Navajo

The Millicent Rogers Museum will host a presentation by Professor Dennis Aigner on his book, “The Swastika Motif: Its Use in Navajo and Oriental Weaving,” Sunday (July 7), 2 p.m., at the Millicent Rogers Museum, 1504 Millicent Rogers Road in El Prado. Aigner will be discussing the early origins of the swastika and its cultural significance. He identifyies the tribes and cultures in the Middle East and Asia where the swastika was used as a design motif. In the late 1800s, the swastika began to appear in Navajo weavings and Native American basketry, beadwork, pottery and jewelry, a press release states.

Much maligned since its adoption by the Nazi Party in 1921 and its central place on the German national flag from 1933-45, the swastika enjoyed a beneficent, even cosmic significance for thousands of years before that. Literally “well-being” in the ancient Sanskrit language, the swastika has occupied a place of reverence in several cultures and has been a positive symbol in many others, including pre-World War II America.

“To begin,” the release states, “the talk traces the early origins of the swastika and its cultural significance. We identify the tribes and cultures in the Middle East and Asia where the swastika was used as a design motif in their weavings and other utilitarian and decorative objects. Its widespread attraction in pre-World War II America likewise caused it to appear on tools, pottery and many other household items and commercial products. In the late 1800s, the swastika began to appear in Navajo weavings and Native American basketry, beadwork, pottery and jewelry. Our focus is on the use of the swastika motif in Navajo weaving at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. It was promoted as a design motif by two prominent traders but found its way into the weavings of Navajo women from other regions of the reservation as well.”

The talk will be illustrated by actual objects. Aigner’s book is a successor to “The Swastika Symbol in Navajo Textiles,” which is likewise illustrated with numerous line drawings and photographs. Tickets $10, in addition to regular admission. Call (575) 758-2462 or visit online at millicentrogers.org.

Jackson Browne tribute at KTAOS

Each Monday, the KTAOS Solar Center hosts the music series titled “Off the Cuff Live,” in which local artists perform music from different chart-topping musicians. The next one on Monday (July 8) at 7 p.m. sharp will feature a tribute to Jackson Browne. Performing will be well-know local musicians Jimmy Stadler and Stacey Sanders. This show is recorded live so that the following Sunday (July 14), KTAO-FM 101.9 will broadcast it over the airwaves. “Off the Cuff Live” is an all ages show. Cover $15. Call (575) 758-5826.

First Saturday Taos Art Walk

Enjoy a day full of openings, demonstrations and meet-the-artists events with extended gallery hours all around downtown Taos during the First Saturday Art Walk this Saturday (July 6). See what’s new and great in Taos – almost 90 percent of all Taos galleries are owned by local artists. Art Walk is hosted by The Taos Gallery Association – they are inclusive of all galleries, museums and artist studios in Taos County. For more information, contact DAFA gallery at (575) 758-7113.

Opening receptions for several art exhibits

• In their annual exhibition and sale at the northside Hillcrest Bank, 1356 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, the Taos Pastel Group features the vibrant and colorful pastels of Mary Gould, Cindy Grossman, Annette Grubiss and Kathleen Smith. Meet-the-artists reception is Friday (July 5) from 6-8 p.m. Refreshments and music will be featured. The exhibit will be on view at the bank through September 30.

• Taos Community Artist Co-op members Antionette Gonzales and Patricia Morrison showcase their work for the month of July. Gonzales makes cards for all occasions, dream catchers and novelty items; and Morrison hand-dyes silk scarfs and ponchos. Meet these artists on the first Saturday’s Art Walk (July 6) from 5-7 p.m., and enjoy light refreshments. In the Historic Taos County Courthouse at 121 North Plaza. Contact Effie F. Romero at talpacommunitycenter@yahoo.com or (575) 751-1014.

• Pat Pollard is showing her latest abstracts and imaginary landscapes for the month of July. There will be a reception for the artist on Saturday (July 6) from 4-6 p.m. Admission is free, and the show runs through July 26. The Sage Fine Art Gallery is located at 115 East Taos Plaza. Call (575) 758-9396 for more information.

• Join the Taos Artist Collective on Saturday (July 6) from 5-7 p.m. for the reception of the show titled “Happiness: Color, Light and the Landscape of Taos,” featuring the work of Tatiana Klimov, Jan Nelson and Kirk Buchanan. Klimov, from St. Petersburg, Russia, found her second home in Los Alamos 23 years ago. In the spring of 2017 she pursued painting, portraying positive energy and happiness by splashing bright colors on canvas to share the beauty and inspiration she finds through her love of nature. Nelson builds unique lamps from recycled materials. His work is known for his playfulness, along with a great aesthetic sense that result in beautiful one-of-kind, whimsical lamps and lit creations. Buchanan paints the Southwest landscape in alla prima method with impasto techniques in the style broadly categorized as abstract impressionism. Contact Sundara Heart at (575) 425-0347 or SundaraHeart.com.

• Also on Saturday (July 6), from 5-8 p.m., a relatively recent gallery owner and artist on the Kit Carson block, Cece Palaski, debuts with an enigmatic show, “Hysteria and Other Natural Emotions.” A former Los Angeles social worker and lifetime storyteller, she is representing three of her former professors, photographers of national and international acclaim, along with a group of other local artists. Free. Palaski Fine Art, 129 Kit Carson Road, Taos. Contact Christina Procter at c.m.procter@gmail.com or (978) 257-3170.

Artist demo

Sierrastar Alexandria Koch will offer a live painting demonstration at the Red Arrow Emporium, Wednesday-Friday (July 3-5), from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Koch is a master of rendering realistic paintings of people, dogs and horses. The public is invited to observe her technique. Free. The emporium is located in the Overland Sheepskin Ranch. 575 58-540. Contact Phyllis Tutor at (575) 758-0540 or redarrowemp@gmail.com.

Comments

Private mode detected!

In order to read our site, please exit private/incognito mode or log in to continue.