What to do with those marvelous wild mushrooms

By Ellen Miller Goins
Posted 9/12/19

Story and photos by Ellen Miller GoinsThe skies threaten afternoon rain and Moreno Valley wind gusts hard when I pull up to the Wildflower Bed-and-Breakfast to collect Henrik and Lone Krarup for an …

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What to do with those marvelous wild mushrooms

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The skies threaten afternoon rain and Moreno Valley wind gusts hard when I pull up to the Wildflower Bed-and-Breakfast to collect Henrik and Lone Krarup for an afternoon of mushrooming. Having learned the craft of gathering native fungi from Carlo Gislimberti -- the popular Taos chef turned fine art painter -- I imagine this is a day to "pay it forward." Though Henrik recalls his mother, Ellen, gathering chanterelles in his native Denmark, this is the first time for both of them.

Based on Angel Fire's topography, I have a hunch we'll strike fungi "gold" up in the valley of the Utes. I am wrong, but Henrik has a hunch, too. We continue climbing by vehicle until we are near the summit of Angel Fire Resort's ski mountain. Here the terrain yields splashes of orange and yellow on the ground, under trees and pushing up through moss.

We collect a few pounds along with a single King Bolete (boletus edulis) and a few Hawks Wing then, as the sun sets, and chilly air moves in, we drive back to the B&B. Henrik offers beer while Lone and I clean the chanterelles. We sauté them in butter and garlic, to which Lone adds fresh rosemary, and serve them over toast. This is one of those times when simple is best.

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