Taos Tree Board presents draft plan for taking care of 6,000 community trees

Meeting Tuesday at Taos Council Chambers

By Staci Matlock
editor@taosnews.com
Posted 2/17/19

How many trees are in Taos parks, historic district and other public places in town?

6,000 of dozens of different species.

Many are decades old, growing tall and strong through several generations of Taoseños.

Some …

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Taos Tree Board presents draft plan for taking care of 6,000 community trees

Meeting Tuesday at Taos Council Chambers

Posted

How many trees are in Taos parks, historic district and other public places in town?

6,000, representing dozens of species.

Many are decades old, growing tall and strong through several generations of Taoseños.

Some 300 or more are young, planted by members of the Taos Tree Board and volunteers.

The tree board - made up of certified arborists, students, landscape architects and more - spent the last three years counting all the community’s trees.

Now they’ve drafted a plan for how the community can care for Taos trees and help plant the next generation of saplings to keep the town shady, even through climate change. The board will present the draft plan  and talk about other tree issues at a board meeting from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Tuesday (Feb. 19) at the town of Taos council chambers, 120 Civic Plaza Drive. Everyone is invited to attend and find out more about how they can help keep Taos trees healthy.

“We’re in the last stage of our tree management plan. The official name for that is the Taos Community Tree Care Plan,” said Paul Bryan Jones, one of the Taos Tree Board founders and a long-time certified arborist.

The board is still finalizing details in the plan, including a list of the best, most resiliant trees to plant in Taos in light of climate change.

The 29-page plan must still be presented to the town of Taos council for approval in the weeks ahead.

The plan is one of many projects the Taos Tree Board has undertaken, along with planting new trees, training the next generation of arborists, and teaching students about urban forests.

Tree Board member Felix Banuelos, also a certified arborist, said she sees trees as something that can bring people together. “I think Taos is ready to be connected, with the land and water and trees, again,” she said.

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