Art

The 'other dimensional world' of Nöel Anderson

Taos artist brings a wealth of stories from found objects to Magpie Gallery show

By Tamra Testerman
tempo@taosnews.com
Posted 3/6/19

Walk into Magpie Gallery on opening night of Nöel Anderson's show and you'll discover yourself enveloped by the many dimensions of this noteworthy Taos artist.

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Art

The 'other dimensional world' of Nöel Anderson

Taos artist brings a wealth of stories from found objects to Magpie Gallery show

Posted

Walk into Magpie Gallery on opening night of Nöel Anderson's show and you'll discover yourself enveloped by the many dimensions of this noteworthy Taos artist.

Think carved vintage utensils suspended from the ceiling and multidimensional assemblages on every surface with stories to whisper if you dare listen.

The show, titled "Broken Boundaries," will open with a reception Saturday (March 9) from 5-7 p.m. at the venue located in the Overland Sheepskin Compound at 1405 Paseo del Pueblo Norte in El Prado. Admission is free and the public is invited.

Gallery owner Georgia Gersh said the show is "spectacular. There's over 100 pieces. It's an immersive experience." She added, "We have a strong community of recycling and found-objects artists in Taos - Nöel Anderson's aesthetics are sophisticated and meticulous. The longer you look at her work, the more you see a world somewhere in the two- and three-dimensional sculptural realm. It's meaningful and powerful. She's not just painting pretty landscapes. Her life is complicated … so is her work."

This is a special show for Magpie because Anderson is the artist who inspired Gersh to open the gallery a few years ago. In the press release for the show Gersh said, "She was one of my original inspirations for opening Magpie because I could not believe that an artist of her creative ability did not have representation."

Anderson is one of the top-selling artists in the gallery and is collected around the world. "I am delighted that she will open the [2019] season at Magpie with a dynamic, magical, three-dimensional exhibit. She is the first artist that I represent to have a second show. The first was a huge success and a wonderful spectacle. I'm looking forward to seeing how she fills the room from her meticulous miniatures to her sculpture."

In her artist's statement, Anderson describes the show as a retrospective of her work as an artist spanning the last 20 years. She explores a "range of mediums, materials and forms - it is a representation of all the venues I've explored in the art world, and my visual evolution of the past two decades … My palette is wide, my experiences and skill sets are many. Being able to integrate and 'use it all' is satisfying to the soul. Creating has always been a part of me, who I am. I am grateful to have found a 'something' that I love to do.' I believe everybody should have a 'something.' "

Here's more of what she had to say about her work:

Do you believe in magic?

I believe in the natural magic of the Earth.

What inspires you?

Earth, nature, our natural world is my inspiration. I'm attracted to pattern, rhythm and sacred geometry which shows up everywhere in our everyday lives.

What takes your breath away?

Sunrise on the ocean, palm trees, warm weather.

If you could host a dinner party for influential people (dead or alive), who would you invite?

It would be Snow White, and then I'd invite the Seven Dwarfs.

What advice would your give your younger self?

To a younger "me," I would say, buckle up, get ready -- it's a long and bumpy road ahead. Stay focused, and keep working on what you love to do, no matter what life brings.

What brought you to Taos?

I moved from Kansas City Art Institute. I was invited to teach art to children in a small village, Tierra Amarilla, in 1988. From there I moved to Santa Fe for a while and then to Taos. I was headed back to Ohio to live with my brother and stopped through Taos to say goodbye to my friends. I came up through the Brazos and there was a double rainbow. That was 30 years ago.

What is your work ritual?

I balance out labor with more meditative methods. Sometimes I'm sitting inside doing meticulous stamping, and other times I'm grinding, carving and tooling in my workshop outside. I work late when the world is quiet.

How do you define success?

Making money at what you love to do.

What books do you have on your nightstand right now?

I Ching, Eckhart Tolle and the Bible

What do you love most about being an artist?

It's good work and it's fun. It's allows me to maintain individuality and independence. Not made in China.

Describe your current body of work and the journey up to now.

This is a good representation of the styles and forms I've been exploring over the last two decades. Leather, wood, books and natural materials. For the past few years, I have been exploring form outside of the box, so to speak. I like to experiment, trying out new things and expanding outward with new ideas.

Although my work has a pattern, method and repetition, it is met with randomness, the spontaneous and free flow of the moment. Despite the apparent physicality, the form and the real density of my work, I have allowed a much more dreamy and unpredictable aspect to emerge, which has been fun. Like a good balance between play and hard work, it's masculine and feminine at the same time and the pieces themselves reflect that.

Food and libations will be served at the reception, and the artist will be present. For more information, call Magpie at (781) 248-0166 or visit magpietaos.com.

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