Terrorism suspect hospitalized

By John Miller
jmiller@taosnews.com
Posted 10/24/19

A U.S. District Court judge in Albuquerque has ordered one of the five people arrested last year at the makeshift compound near the Colorado border in Taos County to be hospitalized after finding her mentally unfit to stand trial.

You have exceeded your story limit for this 30-day period.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Terrorism suspect hospitalized

Posted

A U.S. District Court judge in Albuquerque has ordered one of the five people arrested last year at the makeshift compound near the Colorado border in Taos County to be hospitalized after finding her mentally unfit to stand trial.

Following a hearing held on Oct. 15, Chief U.S. District Court Judge William Johnson found that Jany Leveille suffers from a "mental disease or defect" rendering her unable to understand the charges she faces, court proceedings related to her charges and incapable of assisting in her own defense.

Leveille, who is an undocumented immigrant from Haiti, will initially be hospitalized for a maximum period of four months. If doctors determine she could eventually become competent to stand trial, they will continue to work with her for an "additional reasonable period of time" and may even require her to consume medication to help her attain competency.

Leveille and her four co-defendants - Siraj Ibn Wahhaj, Hujrah Wahhaj, Subhanah Wahhaj and Lucas Morton - were first taken into custody by the Taos County Sheriff's Office at the compound near Amalia on Aug. 3, 2018. The raid was conducted to search for Siraj Ibn Wahhaj's missing 3-year-old son, Abdul-Ghani Wahhaj, who was reported missing by his mother in Georgia in 2017. But while officers rescued 11 other children found living at the squalid dwelling, they found the toddler's remains buried in a makeshift tunnel dug below the property during another search three days later.

Prosecutors have alleged that the child had suffered from a form of epilepsy, but that Leveille and Siraj Ibn Wahhaj believed he was possessed by evil spirits. Authorities say they denied the child medication he had been prescribed by a doctor and instead subjected him to religious rituals comparable to exorcisms. It is alleged that the Wahhaj toddler died during one of the rituals on Christmas Eve 2017, shortly after the group arrived at the compound.

An electronic journal recovered from the compound, allegedly written by Leveille, suggested that she saw herself as a religious prophet for the group and believed that the deceased toddler would be resurrected to instruct them on the government institutions they were to attack and destroy.

The sheriff's office and members of the FBI also recovered numerous firearms, a stockpile of ammunition, a shooting range and other evidence to suggest the adults were preparing to carry out terrorist attacks on government institutions.

Leveille and the four other adults were initially charged with child abuse in Taos County, but those cases were eventually dropped after prosecutors missed a deadline to hold preliminary hearings and federal charges were filed in U.S. District Court.

The five defendants are tentatively scheduled for trial in district court on April 13, 2020.

Comments


Private mode detected!

In order to read our site, please exit private/incognito mode or log in to continue.