Table manners: Holiday food that is a yes or no for pets

Posted 12/24/19

Our pets are family members, too, and will be just as tempted by the delectable range of aromas wafting through family kitchens during the holidays as our human relatives. 

But not all holiday cooking will be healthy for our pets. Here's a list of  some cooking that is safe to share – in moderation – with our furry companions:

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Table manners: Holiday food that is a yes or no for pets

Posted

Our pets are family members, too, and will be just as tempted by the delectable range of holiday aromas wafting through kitchens as our human relatives. 

But not all holiday cooking is healthy for pets. Here's a list of  some cooking that is safe to share – in moderation – with our furry companions:

DOGS

Yes:

  • Plain turkey, no skin
  • Cooked green beans (plain)
  • Sweet potatoes (cooked minus butter, salt and brown sugar)
  • Pumpkin purée (minus spices and sugar)
  • Apples (plain)
  • Cooked carrots (plain)
  • Unsalted peanuts, almonds and cashews
  • Bananas
  • Baked and mashed potatoes (plain only)
  • Unsweetened cranberries
  • Cucumbers
  • Macaroni noodles without cheese

No:

  • Turkey skin, drippings and gravy
  • Turkey twine
  • Turkey bones
  • Ham and bacon
  • Meat fat
  • Stuffing
  • Yeast dough
  • Raw dough
  • Corn on the cob
  • Onion
  • Mushrooms
  • Grapes and raisins
  • Macadamia nuts and black walnuts
  • Cookies and candy
  • Chocolate
  • Alcohol
  • Salty foods
  • Eggnog
  • Nutmeg (can be toxic in large amounts)
  • Xylitol (sugar substitute found in candies, gum and peanut butter)

CATS

Yes:

  • Plain turkey (no spices or grease)
  • Cooked carrots (plain)
  • Cooked green beans and greens (plain)

No:

  • Turkey grease
  • Raw meat
  • Poultry bones
  • Gravy (too rich)
  • Dairy
  • Avocados
  • Onion, garlic, chives, shallots and scallions
  • Raw eggs, raw meat and bones
  • Chocolate
  • Yeast dough
  • Raw dough
  • Cookies and candy
  • Caffeinated drinks
  • Alcohol
  • Milk and dairy products
  • Grapes and raisins
  • Macadamia nuts
  • Salty foods
  • Xylitol (sugar substitute found in candies, gum and peanut butter)

Also note that small portions are best.

Mistletoe, holly, lilies, daffodils and amaryllis can be toxic to pets. Poinsettia leaf sap can cause mouth and esophagus irritation but it would take a large amount to be poisonous to your pet.

— Information provided by petMD.com and vetstreet.com.

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