Movies

Now showing in Taos: 'Avengers: Endgame'

At last, an epic chapter-ender that makes sitting through years of planet crushing battles actually worth it

By Rick Romancito
tempo@taosnews.com
Posted 4/28/19

When you can fly faster than an X-15, crush boulders with your little finger and manipulate matter on a molecular level, sweating the small stuff might seem a bit out of character. But, the success …

You have exceeded your story limit for this 30-day period.

Please log in to continue

Log in
Movies

Now showing in Taos: 'Avengers: Endgame'

At last, an epic chapter-ender that makes sitting through years of planet crushing battles actually worth it

Posted

When you can fly faster than an X-15, crush boulders with your little finger and manipulate matter on a molecular level, sweating the small stuff might seem a bit out of character. But, the success of Marvel's decade-plus "Avenger" series (starting with 2008’s “Iron Man”) lies in how these super-heroes work hard to cultivate their humanity, at least for those that are mostly human. 

And, even those that aren't tend to be portrayed by actors who dig deep to find that inner kernel of heart. They depend on it to define themselves apart from the evil masterminds who regularly show up to destroy their home and hearth.

Admittedly, some of the movies in this series have amounted to little more than hundred million-dollar episodes of "General Hospital" with bulgy biceps and stuff that goes mega-boom. But, with "Endgame," we've hit a chapter-ending (ironically not long after Marvel founder Stan Lee passed into stardust) that actually makes all those sweaty hours pretty close to worth it. And, like the comic books they spawned from, it provides an excuse to go back and watch them over to catch things you might have missed the first time around. 

That, of course, leads us to a mild spoiler alert for those who haven't seen the previous film, "Avengers: Infinity War" — which is on Netflix by the way. Nice of them to leave that up so audiences can go in freshly Avengersized.

So, you've been warned. 

With a snap of his fingers, Thanos (Josh Brolin), an immensely formidable but existentially brooding villain, plunged the entire universe into chaos. This, after obtaining all six infinity stones and setting them into a special glove that gave him godlike power.

If you saw the mid-credit extra scene in "Infinity War," S.H.I.E.L.D. leader Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) managed to summon Captain Marvel (Brie Larson), so, as the remaining Avengers try to pick up the pieces, she shows up and provides them with the inspiration to get the revenge they so desperately seek and maybe right the horrible wrong.

I won’t say what happens, but the story picks up five years later. Everybody is trying to move on, that is until Ant-Man (Paul Rudd) suddenly reappears after having been freed from being stuck in the quantum realm. Putting two-and-two together in a way only sci-fi characters can, they devise a truly crazy plan.

As the story unfolds, directors Anthony Russo and Joe Russo, plus screenwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen Freely, obviously spent a lot of time in the metaphorical salad bowl tossing every piece of lettuce, carrot, tomato, cucumber, and chive so we, the audience, will feel connected to each hero and villain in a panorama that stretches across the universe and into the complexities of each character’s individual plotlines. This offers a hint of nostalgia for those who recall certain battles, personal challenges and even romantic opportunities that were missed. And, it serves as a nice segue into the biggest challenge for the Avengers: To put things back the way they were.

The film’s creative team does a good job doing this, but don’t try to think too hard about some of the practicalities. That alone already has some die-hard fanboys screaming into their popcorn. Suffice it to say, “Endgame” was a fitting end to this portion of the Avengers universe. It may even bring a tear or two.

Again, you’ve been warned.

Tempo grade: A-

“Avengers: Endgame” is rated PG-13 for sequences of sci-fi violence and action, and some language.

It is screening daily at Mitchell Theatres Storyteller Cinema 7, 110 Old Talpa Cañón Road. For show times, tickets and additional information, call (575) 751-4245 or visit storyteller7.com.

Also showing in Taos

Rafiki

MPAA rating: Not rated, but does contain mature content.

Taos Community Auditorium

"Good Kenyan girls become good Kenyan wives," but Kena and Ziki (Samantha Mugatsia and Sheila Munyiva) long for something more. Despite the political rivalry between their families, the girls resist and remain close friends, supporting each other to pursue their dreams in a conservative society. When love blossoms between them, the two girls will be forced to choose between happiness and safety.

Film directed by Wanuri Kahiu was the first Kenyan movie to premier at the Cannes Film Festival but was banned at home due to its depiction of its subject matter.

This film will be screened at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday (April 28) and at 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday (April 29-May 1) at the Taos Community Auditorium, 145 Paseo del Pueblo Norte. For tickets and additional information, call (575) 758-2052 or visit tcataos.org.

Comments


Private mode detected!

In order to read our site, please exit private/incognito mode or log in to continue.