Opinion: La Pocha Nostra exhibit did exactly what it was supposed to do

By Lindsey Lozen, Taos
Posted 9/19/19

By Lindsey Lozen I believe that the La Pocha Nostra exhibit did exactly what it was supposed to do as good art should always do; impassion, incense, provoke and cause discussion as well as make us …

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Opinion: La Pocha Nostra exhibit did exactly what it was supposed to do

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I believe that the La Pocha Nostra exhibit did exactly what it was supposed to do as good art should always do; impassion, incense, provoke and cause discussion as well as make us think.

As a part of an art exhibit they created an opportunity for exploration of many current, disturbing topics in a way that forced us to take notice. If you were offended by the content it is an excellent time to evaluate why it offended you. Was it the content? The political outrages that it highlighted, or was it your own fear and insecurity? Or was it the children?

Using your children as a vehicle to cover your own discomfort with a topic is concerning and ill-conceived. As a parent you are able to direct your children away from that which you deem inappropriate. Nobody “forced” you to watch. If you left your child unattended then you did just that, left your child unattended. A child looks to their parents to determine how they should process information from the world.

There are many scary things out there and I would encourage you to have an open conversation with your children about it. Perhaps that is what La Pocha Nostra would like as well. For us to talk to our children because as a society, we do not. Our children are flooded with imagery on their cellphones daily that is provocative and much more harmful than the La Pocha Nostra exhibit. How will we guide and navigate this? By ignoring it? By hiding behind our own phones, checked out as parents. If you evaluate why seeing a painted and “legally covered” body incites such anger within you, maybe ask the hard question of “why?”. Do we as adults believe that seeing imagery like this will foster infidelity, immortality, and abuse? Those things happen every single day and every single hour in this town and needed no encouragement. Are we afraid of our teens own sexuality instead of accepting it as a part of growing into a normal, healthy adult? Shaming, hatred and ignorance will not stop a child from growing into an adult. It CAN however play into our towns high rate of drug dependence, suicide, and teen pregnancy. I am not afraid of things that happen out in the open like the La Pocha Nostra exhibit, I am however afraid of things that happen behind closed doors like sexual abuse, child abuse, violence against women, opioid and meth abuse, racism, neglect of children, murder, and emotional abuse. These are the things our community should be fighting against. Not with each other over an art exhibit. All the fears that were incited within yourself were here before and remain after the Paseo took place. The exhibit only shook them out of you and made you think about them, and now what can you do to make yourself feel better? It is easy to point a finger at an art exhibit and say it is harmful to children but not so easy to help a child in need. An alarming number of children are neglected and abused each day with no one to turn to. As I said, this art as it was performed fulfilled its duty to make us think, discuss, and feel! I am thankful to have experienced it.

Lindsey Lozen lives in.....

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