Movies

Movie review: ‘Hellboy’

Neil Marshall takes on the virtually impossible task to reboot the underworld’s fun guy — and fails. Big time

By Rick Romancito
tempo@taosnews.com
Posted 4/14/19

Why? Was it really necessary to reboot “Hellboy”?

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Movies

Movie review: ‘Hellboy’

Neil Marshall takes on the virtually impossible task to reboot the underworld’s fun guy — and fails. Big time

Posted

Why? Was it really necessary to reboot “Hellboy”?

Those are probably the questions that will immediately flash through just about any fan’s mind just a few minutes into Neil Marshall’s desperate attempt to outdo the 2004 version by the master, Guillermo Del Toro.

I mean, really. Del Toro was an artist, a Picasso, a Michaelangelo, a Cézanne compared to this paint-by-numbers attempt.

Now, this movie isn’t really an origin story, but there are hints that Marshall wants this to leave his imprint on it. It’s almost unavoidable that he would have to reference where he came from, seeing as how the plot draws from various resources rooted in Mike Mignola’s Dark Horse comic book series.

To those not too familiar with the character, Hellboy (played this time out by David Harbour of “Stranger Things”) was discovered as a baby demon that emerged from the underworld when a Nazi plan to use paranormal forces to win World War II was thwarted by allied commandos. Among the soldiers was a Professor Broom (played here by Ian McShane of “Deadwood”), who took Hellboy under his wing and adopted him as his son.

This incident eventually led to the formation of a super secret organization called the Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense, or BPRD for short. Growing up among the agents of BPRD, the virtually indestructable Hellboy has been employed to fight all manner of monsters, demons and strange phenomena deemed a threat to humanity — usually pounding them into submission with his big stone right hand.

In this movie, we go back to the Middle Ages and are introduced to a wicked sorceress named Nimue, a.k.a. The Blood Queen (Mila Jovovich), who was vanquished in a battle with none other than King Arthur (Mark Stanley) wielding Excalibur. To keep her from using her vast powers to come back to life, the king orders her body cut up and the pieces scattered to far-flung places unknown to him.

Let’s just say Del Toro’s version was rated PG-13. This one isn’t.

Suffice it to say, Nimue finds a way back and now threatens humanity partly as revenge and partly to get Hellboy to recognize a certain part of his unholy heritage.

Lots of violence, much of it involving bloody dismemberment, and harsh language does push this into the realm of this story’s origins in the edgy comic book. But, dare I say, Del Toro’s Hellboy (played by Ron Perlman) had a certain boyish charm. Here, he’s just a mess. And, so is the movie.

Tempo grade: D

“Hellboy” is rated R for strong bloody violence and gore throughout, and language.

It is screening daily at Mitchell Storyteller 7 Theatres, 110 Old Talpa Cañón Road. For show times, tickets and additional information, call (575) 751-4245 or visit storyteller7.com.

Also showing in Taos

The Brink

MPAA rating: Not rated, but contains some mature content.

Taos Community Auditorium

When Steve Bannon left his position as White House chief strategist less than a week after the Charlottesville "Unite the Right" rally in August 2017, he was already a notorious figure in Trump's inner circle, and for bringing a far-right ideology into the highest echelons of American politics.

Unconstrained by an official post, although some say he still has a direct line to the White House, he became free to peddle influence as a perceived kingmaker, turning his controversial brand of nationalism into a global movement.

This documentary by Alison Klayman follows Bannon through the 2018 mid-term elections in the United States, shedding light on his efforts to mobilize and unify far-right parties in order to win seats in the May 2019 European Parliamentary elections. To maintain his power and influence, the former Goldman Sachs banker and media investor reinvents himself, as he has many times before, this time as the self-appointed leader of a global populist movement.

Keen manipulator of the press and gifted self-promoter, Bannon continues to draw headlines and protests wherever he goes, feeding the powerful myth on which his survival relies.

This film will be screened at 2 p.m. Sunday (April 14) and at 7 p.m. Monday through Wednesday (April 15-17) at the Taos Community Auditorium, 145 Paseo del Pueblo Norte. For tickets and additional information, call (575) 758-2052 or visit tcataos.org.

Missing Link

MPAA rating: PG for action/peril and some mild rude humor.

Mitchell Storyteller 7 Theatres

Written and directed by Chris Butler, this stop-motion animated film comedy is about an explorer who encounters a Sasquatch-type creature and must escort him to his Yeti cousins in the Himalayas.

Tired of living a solitary life in the Pacific Northwest, Mr Link (voiced by Zach Galifianakis), who is eight feet tall and covered in fur, recruits fearless explorer Sir Lionel Frost (Hugh Jackman) to guide him on a journey to find his long-lost relatives in the fabled valley of Shangri-La. Along with adventurer Adelina Fortnight (Zoe Saldana), the trio encounters their fair share of peril as they travel to the far reaches of the world. Through it all, they learn that sometimes one can find a family in the places one least expects.

Additional voice talents include Stephen Fry, Timothy Olyphant, and Emma Thompson.

It is screening daily at Mitchell Storyteller 7 Theatres, 110 Old Talpa Cañón Road. For show times, tickets and additional information, call (575) 751-4245 or visit storyteller7.com.

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