Obituary

Julia Margaret Moore

Posted

Passed away peacefully, surrounded by family and friends, in her home at Taos Retirement Village in Taos, New Mexico on the evening of February 16, 2019. Beloved partner of Rebecca, she is survived by daughters Sibyl (Karen), Mollie (Geri), granddaughters Lucy and Julia, Rebecca's daughter Harley, brother Joseph (Karen), and sister-in-law Eileen. Born in New Orleans on April 12, 1939, Julia was the daughter of Dr. William J. Moore and Mary Ellen Orebaugh Moore. Raised in Grants Pass, Oregon, Julia graduated from Pomona College with a major in art history. She chose art history believing that, through art, the history of civilizations comes alive in concrete, tangible ways. She obtained an MA in art history at NYU's Institute of Fine Arts in 1966 and an MLS in Library Science from Rutgers University in 1967. During this time she revised the Pocket Dictionary of Art Terms, published by New York Graphic Society. She lived in Geneva, Illinois from 1971 to 1982, during which time she developed and edited an acclaimed local history, Geneva: Its Times and Places, published in 1977. In 1983 she returned to New York where she was an editor at R. R. Bowker and was editor-in-chief at the Whitney Library of Design, a division of Watson Guptill, in the late1980s. In 1989, she went to Harry N. Abrams, Inc. She soon became the Director of Textbook Publishing, leading to her appointment as an Executive Vice President. In her fourteen years at Abrams, she edited three editions of Janson's History of Art and conceived and developed Marilyn Stokstad's Art History, which quickly became the best-selling art history textbook of that era. In addition, she edited many other major trade books and textbooks in the fields of art, art history, architecture, and the humanities. Her interest in Asian cultures bore fruit in two major monographs, Indian Painting by Mira Seth and The Sacred Art of Tibet by Robert Thurman and Marilyn Rhie.In 2004, Julia moved permanently to Taos, New Mexico, a place she had long hoped to spend her remaining years. That same year, she was diagnosed with thyroid cancer. She moved into what is now Taos Retirement Village. As an independent editor, her work increasingly focused on the history and art of the Southwest. She edited three major works - Gerald Nordlander's, Mark Lavatelli's, and Charles Strong's Richard Diebenkorn in New Mexico (Museum of New Mexico Press), Elizabeth Barlow Rogers's Learning Las Vegas (MNM Press) and Helen Park Bigelow's David Park, Painter: Nothing Held Back (Hudson Hills Press). In addition, she edited a number of scholarly works and major illustrated monographs. She was a board member of the Taos County Historical Society, served on the board of the Harwood Alliance, and was for several years on the Selection Committee of the Harwood Museum of Art. Julia made a deliberate decision to do things that would benefit Taos and contribute civically in areas important to her. In part, as a gift to Taos and in gratitude for the career she loved, Julia collaborated with the late Corinna A. Santistevan and the Taos County Historical Society in shaping and editing the award-winning Taos, A Topical History, published by the Museum of New Mexico press in 2013. For the fourteen years Julia lived with an incurable cancer, her care at MD Anderson in Houston was decisive in her longevity. Julia courageously and calmly lived with her disease, cared for and supported by her devoted life partner, Rebecca. Julia repeatedly expressed how profoundly grateful she was for the care, concern, and love of her family and friends during the long-lasting vigil. She will be deeply missed. A celebration of Julia's life will be held at the Brandenburg House on the grounds of the Taos Retirement Village - harp music at 1:30PM, ceremony at 2PM on Saturday, March 9th. Contributions in her memory can be made to the Somos Literary Society of Taos, 108 Civic Plaza Drive B, Taos, New Mexico 87571 or Mountain Home Health Hospice Program, 630 Paseo Del Pueblo Sur, Suite 180, Taos, New Mexico 87571.

Comments


Private mode detected!

In order to read our site, please exit private/incognito mode or log in to continue.