Books

It's a wrap

SOMOS features final readings in 2019 National Poetry Month celebration

By Tempo staff
tempo@taosnews.com
Posted 4/24/19

All good things come to an end, they say. So it is with this year's National Poetry Month series at the Society of the Muse of the Southwest, aka SOMOS.This year's celebration concludes …

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Books

It's a wrap

SOMOS features final readings in 2019 National Poetry Month celebration

Posted

All good things come to an end, they say. So it is with this year's National Poetry Month series at the Society of the Muse of the Southwest, aka SOMOS.

This year's celebration concludes with readings by poets from Taos, Albuquerque and Colorado. All readings are free to attend, with donations appreciated. All events unless noted will take place at the SOMOS Salon, 108 Civic Plaza Drive, Taos.

Starting off Thursday (April 25) at 7 p.m. Isobel O'Hare and Tara Shea Burke will be featured.

Burke is a queer poet and teacher from the Blue Ridge Mountains and Hampton Roads, Virginia. She is a writing instructor, editor, creative coach and yoga teacher who has taught and lived in Virginia, New Mexico and Colorado. She said she believes in community building, encouragement, and practice-based living, writing, teaching and art. Find more about her work at tarasheaburke.com.

O'Hare is a poet and essayist. She is the author of three chapbooks and her work is included in several anthologies. Her collection of erasures of celebrity sexual assault apologies, "All This Can Be Yours," was published in 2018 by University of Hell Press. She is editing an anthology of erasure poetry, "Erase the Patriarchy," due out from University of Hell Press in 2019. O'Hare has been the recipient of awards from Split This Rock and the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation. She co-edits the journal and small press Dream Pop.

O'Hare also plans to teach a workshop on erasure poetry Saturday (April 27), 1-3 p.m., at the SOMOS Salon. Cost is $55, $45 for SOMOS members. To register, visit somostaos.org or call (575) 758-0081.

Lise Goett and Veronica Golos will read from their work Friday (April 26) at 7 p.m. at the Taos Art Museum at Fechin House, 227 Paseo del Pueblo Norte.

Goett's second manuscript, "Leprosarium" (Tupelo Press, 2018), was a selection in the July 2015 Open Reading Period of Tupelo Press and the 2012 winner of the Robert H. Winner Memorial Award in Poetry from the Poetry Society of America. Her other awards include The Paris Review Discovery Award, The Pen Southwest Book Award in Poetry, the Capricorn Prize, the James D. Phelan Award, and The Barnard New Women Poets Prize for her first poetry collection, "Waiting for the Paraclete," as well as fellowships from The Milton Center and the Creative Writing Institute at the University of Wisconsin.

Golos is the author of three poetry books, "Rootwork: Lost Writings of John Brown and Mary Day Brown" (3: A Taos Press), "Vocabulary of Silence" (Red Hen Press, 2011), winner of the 2011 New Mexico Book Award, poems from which are translated into Arabic by poet Nizar Sartawi, and "A Bell Buried Deep" (Storyline Press, 2004), co-winner of the 16th annual Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize, nominated for a Pushcart Prize by Edward Hirsch and adapted for stage and performed at Claremont School of Theology, Claremont, California.

Her newest poetry book, "Girl," is due out this spring from 3: A Taos Press. She is also co-editor of the Taos Journal of International Poetry & Art, former poetry editor for the Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion and core faculty at Tupelo Press's Writers Conferences.

Finally, Melisa Garcia and Michael Murphy read from their poetry Sunday (April 28) at 3 p.m.

Garcia is a third-year doctoral student in rhetoric and writing at the University of New Mexico. Her interest lies in the representation of Central America, civil war testimonials and immigration. She is originally from Long Beach, California, where her family still lives. Her work has appeared in literary journals Huizache, Spillway and The Packinghouse Review among others.

Murphy said he hopped a train headed west from Massachusetts and Maine in 1993. "He entered into a loving relationship with wide open spaces and mountain wilderness, making a home in Alaska where the relationship blossomed," a press release states. "He moved to New Mexico in 2011 after the birth of his son Rio and fell in love with all that is Taos. His creative muse approved of the move."

He works as a counselor supporting people pursuing change. For part of the year, he hosts the spoken word open mic at SOMOS.

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