Fine art

Interactive media artist to give lecture

Ethan Jackson is a former Wurlitzer Foundation fellow and Paseo participant

By Tempo staff
tempo@taosnews.com
Posted 2/20/19

Among his recent notable projects and exhibitions are those at Gallery Sugata, Kyoto (a series of generative anamorphic photographs).

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Fine art

Interactive media artist to give lecture

Ethan Jackson is a former Wurlitzer Foundation fellow and Paseo participant

Posted

Avisual artist and designer working in light, photography, interactive media and installation is planning an artist talk today (Thursday, Feb. 21) at 5:30 p.m. at the Harwood Museum of Art, 238 Ledoux Street.

Ethan Jackson is a former Wurlitzer Foundation fellow whose visual art spans "traditional and manipulated photographs to experiential installations made solely of light and space," J. Matthew Thomas, curator of exhibitions at the Harwood, said. "His work is anchored in perpetual immediacy while conjuring the fantastic and dreamlike. He will present an overview of his work, showing connections between various projects, exploring the development of ideas and discussing relationship of place and perception, physics and dream," Thomas adds.

During this artist talk Jackson will project visuals of his work in the museum's Arthur Bell Auditorium.

Jackson's projects appear nationally and internationally via public and private commissions, institutions, fellowships, residencies and grants. He recently completed "clerestory," a commission for the Denver Public Library, and has been a finalist for several large public commissions, including Denver's Union Station. He has been artist-in-residence at Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Colorado, Ucross in Wyoming, Djerassi in California, the Wurlitzer Foundation in Taos and Yaddo in New York, among others.

Among his recent notable projects and exhibitions are those at Gallery Sugata, Kyoto (a series of generative anamorphic photographs), Duke University (optical installation at the Divinity School), The Paseo Project (interactive video at the Taos New Media Festival) and the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historic Park (optical installations as K2FF artist-in-residence).

"His practice has grown from photography to installation, sculpture and beyond, with an underlying interest in optics and perception," according to his website (ethanjacksonprojects.net). "Works range from low-technology camera obscura based light-environments without electronic or digital means, to generative and responsive digital video and graphic projects, as well as ongoing series of photographs.

"A general theme of perceptual and representational play underlies almost all of his work. Individual projects build further with varied subject matter and unique material, aesthetic and conceptual approaches. The work is broken down here into several broad categories: architectural optics, photography, and video and digital works. Some of the themes that cut through these categories are the camera obscura, anamorphics, landscape, tabletop work, generative imagery and interactive works."

In addition to the talk by Jackson, Thomas invites museum goers to visit the exhibitions "Birds of Appetite: Alchemy and Apparition, Works by Izumi Yokoyama and Tasha Ostrander" and "Lynda Benglis: Bird's Nests," both of which opened Feb. 9 and will be on view through May 12. Also, make plans to visit "Judy Chicago: The Birth Project" opening June 2.

The Helene Wurlitzer Foundation of New Mexico is the oldest artist residency program west of the Mississippi. It was established in 1954. It has brought hundreds of visual artists, writers and composers to Taos. Through residences to painters, poets, sculptors, writers, playwrights, screenwriters, composers, photographers and filmmakers, of national and international origin, many artists fell in love with Taos and remained in the area after their residency ended.

Since the 1950s with the first grantee, Agnes Martin, the number of artists who have been introduced to Taos by the Wurlitzer Foundation has grown, with contributions by Michio Takayama, Earl Stroh and Andrew Dasburg, to name just a few, a press release states.

Admission is $10, free to museum members. For more information, call (575) 758-9826 or visit harwoodmuseum.org.

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