Can you really grow younger?

By Ellen Wood
Posted 1/24/20

A reader of my Taos News column wrote to say that he cannot believe that growing younger is possible. He also said, "It just isn't true when someone in their 40s or 50s says, 'Getting old is a matter of the mind. Think young and you will be young.'"

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Can you really grow younger?

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A reader of my Taos News column wrote to say that he cannot believe that growing younger is possible. He also said, "It just isn't true when someone in their 40s or 50s says, 'Getting old is a matter of the mind. Think young and you will be young.'"

His name is Ron and he makes a valid point. I'm writing this to explain my point of view: I know it's true that we can grow younger because it has happened to me. No, I don't look younger - and if appearance is one of the criteria, I fail there.

Ron told me, "Our bodies do break down - just as an old car does." That's correct; however, resources are available to help us slow the deterioration of our body. I believe it's a combination of diet, exercise, the right supplements, right thinking and speaking, prayer, meditation and mindfulness, loving family and friends, and the Tibetan Rites of Rejuvenation.

My fingers are crooked now, but I don't have the pain of arthritis anymore. Was it diet? Supplements? I can't say exactly but certainly they helped.

Around the turn of the millennium, five years after my mother died of Alzheimer's, I had the signs of short-term memory loss. Was that caused by the frightening prospect that Alzheimer's is hereditary? Did I talk myself into it? Perhaps. Or perhaps not. It's possible that today, at 83, since I have the Alzheimer's gene, APO-e4, I might have been in a nursing home like my mother if I hadn't developed a daily program of mind/body/spirit practices to turn my life around 15 years ago. These practices reversed the early symptoms of Alzheimer's and gave me tons more energy.

For my brain, I take certain supplements like phosphatidylserine, vinpocetine and a small dose of lithium prescribed by one of the world's top anti-aging physicians who happens to have the Alzheimer's gene, too. My brain also benefits from Neurochondria, prescribed by a doctor of Oriental medicine in Taos. I am not a health care practitioner so if these supplements interest you, please ask your doctor about them.

The Tibetan Rites of Rejuvenation are ancient physical movements that were developed by lamas as a path to higher consciousness and youthfulness. You can learn how to do them by watching a video on the home page of my website: howtogrowyounger.com. For me, these rites are miraculous.

Ron agreed with me about self-talk. He quoted from my article: "Scientists have peered into the life of our trillions of cells and found that they are actually responding to the environment of our thoughts and beliefs," and he added, "I believe this is so and have for a long time." Yes! Mindfulness and right speech are a crucial element to growing younger.

So, in my opinion, everything Ron believes is right for him and what I believe is right for me. What are your beliefs about aging? Are you willing to make lifestyle changes?

Our goal is not to live forever, but as the decades pile up, the ideal is to be healthy, healthy, healthy, healthy, healthy, die!

Ellen Wood of Questa is an award-winning author of the series of books, "The Secret Method for Growing Younger." Her website is howtogrowyounger.com. Contact her at ellen@howtogrowyounger.com.

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