Art

Back-to-back artistry at Overland galleries

Envision and Magpie feature vivid multimedia works in simultaneous openings

By Tempo staff
tempo@taosnews.com
Posted 9/3/19

The Overland Compound in El Prado will be the epicenter of two remarkable art exhibitions that open simultaneously Saturday (Sept. 7) from 5-7 p.m.- at the galleries Envision and Magpie …

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Art

Back-to-back artistry at Overland galleries

Envision and Magpie feature vivid multimedia works in simultaneous openings

Posted

The Overland Compound in El Prado will be the epicenter of two remarkable art exhibitions that open simultaneously Saturday (Sept. 7) from 5-7 p.m.- at the galleries Envision and Magpie Taos.

At Envision Gallery, a Dutch native based in Dallas, Texas, named Hubertus Winnubst will be showing an exhibit of his painterly works. Winnubst has traveled extensively throughout the American West and Southwest, gallery owner Jimmy Murray writes in a press release. Drawn by the desert, sky and forest, Winnubst has been coming to Taos since the early '80s. He is particularly inspired by the expansive landscape and has a home and studio in Arroyo Hondo.

A natural talent

The artist possesses "a solid background in literature, philosophy, metaphysics, art history, photography and design," the release states. "He is a natural talent, intuitively spreading oil paint on canvas. Obvious influences are Willem de Kooning, Robert Rauschenberg and Fritz Scholder."

In the mid-'80s, at a time when contemporary art was exploding in America, Winnubst had a job delivering food to corporate offices where there were abstracts on every wall. He thought to himself, 'I can do better than that' and started painting."

Growing up in a family run business, a European deli, café and bakery, he was introduced to many characters. Another Holland native and established artist Arie Van Selm was generous with materials and compliments. Southern Methodist University fine art professor Bill Komodore invited him to start sitting in on classes and used him as an example after the first two days of figure drawing, which was Winnubst's primary attempt. He saw immediate sales when he began showing in Dallas in the late '80s and "has been on a roll ever since," Murray says.

This body of work represents Winnubst's philosophy: "My work is an expression of my visceral response to the moment as it unfolds during the act of creation. For me, image making is the result of an intuitive process that reacts to the stimuli around and within me--my thoughts, fears, joys and passions. I am informed by the seasons, music and the world in which I participate. I am an evolving human in an evolving world, and I strive to reveal my reactions to this world on my canvases."

This will be Envision Gallery's premier show of the season. For more information, contact Jimmy Murray at jimmytaos@gmail.com or (575) 751-1344.

Diverse layers

"My paintings are multilayered: layers of color, added, removed and repainted over time. I want viewers to look beyond the surface, to go into the color and wander through the textures into another place," Taos artist Norlynne Coar writes about her exhibition titled "Palimpsest," which also opens Saturday at Georgia Gersh's Magpie Taos gallery.

The gallery's September 2019 Fall Arts Show defines "palimpsest" as "the process of effacing in order to create something new, while what was there before shows through, creating a multilayered image, and what was there before becomes part of something new. Something having usually diverse layers or aspects apparent beneath the surface."

Coar first came to Taos in 1979 and made strong connections here that have thankfully pulled her back and forth since, a gallery statement reads. Coar's résumé is loaded with experiences that most could only dream of. She is an incredibly dynamic artist, weaving through mediums seamlessly and still making time to keep the Taos Fall Arts Festival expanding evolving.

"Nature, energy and light inspire me," Coar writes. "I grew up on the Pacific coast, and the influence of the ocean, sky and horizon is obvious in my art. Nature and artists erase, rework and re-create. Not unlike a wave or Zen ensoō - the circular beginning and end continuing one after the other, in a wheel of birth, death and rebirth. Like new leaves popping up on barren winter branches and saplings springing up from the roots of dead trees; like old paintings surfacing under masterpieces; and like artists working and then reworking their pieces to create new works of art atop what was there before."

Coar initially landed in Taos with a friend of a friend, Ron Davis, who owned an art supply store on Kit Carson Road at the time. After about a month of living in an apartment attached to the store and helping out, anthropologists Curt and Polly Schaafsma invited her to house sit their little adobe out in Arroyo Hondo because Curt had accepted a museum position in Santa Fe.

During this time the Taos art world centered around the Stables Gallery of the then-Taos Art Association, and Coar's paintings were included in several shows there. Her ceramic masks were shown at the Clay & Fiber Gallery behind the Stables, and later in the spring, four independent artists had a show at the old armory on Civic Plaza Drive.

She says of this period in her life, "For income, my friend, who was managing a restaurant up in the ski valley, gave me a winter job. Every morning four of us would meet at about 6 a.m. and pile into one vehicle or another to ride up the mountain. Fortunately I had graphics and typography skills that were in demand, so when the ski valley closed for the season I worked for both the Taos News, then located behind Taos Plaza, and Taos Magazine, which used the Columbine Printers typesetting equipment."

Eventually, after much traveling and career-building, she is now a Taos Fall Arts Festival board member responsible for the creation and placement of advertising, marketing and promotional materials, gratefully assisted by graphic designer Anna MacGruder.

For more, contact Georgia Gersh at georgiagersh@hotmail.com or (781) 248-0166.

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