Film

‘Artifishal’ film depicts wild salmon’s slide toward extinction

Tempo staff
tempo@taosnews.com
Posted 10/24/19

The Living Rio Campaign is hosting a new Patagonia feature film screening of “Artifishal.” It is described as a film “about people, rivers and the fight for the future of wild fish and the environment that supports them. It explores wild salmon’s slide toward extinction, threats posed by fish hatcheries and fish farms and our continued loss of faith in nature.”

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Film

‘Artifishal’ film depicts wild salmon’s slide toward extinction

Posted

The Living Rio Campaign is hosting a new Patagonia feature film screening of “Artifishal.” It is described as a film “about people, rivers and the fight for the future of wild fish and the environment that supports them. It explores wild salmon’s slide toward extinction, threats posed by fish hatcheries and fish farms and our continued loss of faith in nature.”

“Artifishal,” a new documentary about salmon, “might, in less capable hands, have been a tiresome screed, another damning diary of how humans have despoiled the Earth,” according to a May 2019 review in The Guardian. “In salmon’s case, we have interrupted one of the most dramatic cycles of nature, the wild fish’s journey from the rivers where they spawn to the oceans where they grow and back again. The result is that fish have died, species that eat them have died, communities that depend on them have faded, the food supply has been polluted and a lot of tax dollars have been wasted … In an inspired gambit, ‘Artifishal’ takes a swerve into the metaphyscial, framing the salmon emergency as a question about the human soul, about what it needs – about what we need – to survive.

“The contention of the filmmakers is that while it may be human nature to seek dominion and control over the rest of nature, the very thing we need to survive is precisely that which defies our control, that thing which, when we seek to subjugate it, instead either slips through our nets, or is caught and dies. If we drive the wild to extinction, the film suggests, we will bring our own that much closer.”

Admission is free and open to the public. The screening is planned today (Oct. 24) at the Harwood Museum of Art, 238 Ledoux Street. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., film starts at 6 p.m. To view the trailer, visit patagonia.com/artifishal.html. Call the museum at (575) 758-9826.

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