'Armond Lara Extravaganza' comes to town

Rare show in Taos is thanks to FaraHNHeight Fine Art and Revolt Gallery

By Tempo staff
tempo@taosnews.com
Posted 9/18/19

A special exhibition is coming our way. FaraHNHeight Fine Art in collaboration with Revolt Gallery is "honored and enthusiastic" to bring the Armond Lara Extravaganza to Taos during …

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'Armond Lara Extravaganza' comes to town

Rare show in Taos is thanks to FaraHNHeight Fine Art and Revolt Gallery

Posted

A special exhibition is coming our way. FaraHNHeight Fine Art in collaboration with Revolt Gallery is "honored and enthusiastic" to bring the Armond Lara Extravaganza to Taos during 2019 Taos Fall Arts Festival.

The exhibition will open with a reception today (Sept. 19), 5 p.m., at Revolt Gallery, 222 Paseo del Pueblo Norte. Then it will run daily with selected open house days from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. and by appointment until the end of the month. The exhibition will feature many never before exhibited works such as prints, studies, drafts, sketches, scrolls, and other surprises.

"Armond Lara got out of the hospital in Santa Fe today and is home resting," according to a Sept. 11 Facebook post by FaraHNHeight Fine Art. "He will most likely be moving to Seattle, Washington, to be closer to his boys beginning of next week. We had the pleasure of visiting him two weeks ago at his home and will do so again tomorrow. Unfortunately, he will not be able to attend the exhibition next week at the Revolt Gallery in Taos. We at FaraHNHeight Fine Art send Armond and his family well wishes and good vibes."

"When Armond Lara talks about the Southwest, his Navajo heritage is readily apparent. When Armond Lara articulates the universe through his art, he speaks with a muted eloquence of the beauty of the Earth, of the power of a myth, of the inherent harmony in nature," writes author Susan Brown McGreevy, a Native American art scholar.

Lara was born in 1939 in Denver and raised in Walsenburg, a coal mining town in southeastern Colorado. His mother was Navajo and his father was Mexican. He was educated at the Colorado Institute of Art and Glendale College in California and also attended the University of Washington in Seattle, where he was influenced by Japanese master paper artist Paul Horuechi.

He also worked with Mexican muralist Pablo O'Higgins, Richard Diebenkorn and Helen Frankenthaler. His paintings and drawings often incorporate handmade paper, found objects and mixed media including traditional Navajo beadwork that has been sewn on to the canvas. His carved marionettes of historical cultural figures such as Crazy Horse, Georgia O'Keeffe, Frida Kahlo, Man Ray and Billy the Kid are created in the spirit of the Koshare, the sacred clown that participates in the religious dances of the Río Grande Pueblo People.

After years of working in the aerospace industry in Seattle and then in arts administration, Lara helped to establish the 1 Percent for the Arts ordinance in Seattle in 1973, which was one of the first cities in the United States to adopt funding for public art. When Lara relocated to Santa Fe in the 1980s, he participated in his first Indian Market, where Georgia O'Keeffe purchased two of his works, one of which was gifted to the Smithsonian. In 1996 Lara founded the Santa Fe Artist Emergency Medical Fund which has been one of the many factors contributing to his reputation as a leader in the arts not only for Native Peoples but for all artists. Lara is in museum collections worldwide.

For more information, email FaraHNHeight Fine Art director Gregory F. Farah at farahnheight@gmail.com or call (575) 751-4278.

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