Covid-19

An unprecedented graduation

By Matthew Narvaiz
sports@taosnews.com
Posted 5/27/20

On Friday (May 15) evening, I quickly got the feeling that we are living in unprecedented times. What we're going through, this whole pandemic and all, is something we've never seen before.

And watching my sister in her cap and gown, in the front yard of my parents' home in Albuquerque, waving at drivers in the cars who drove by to wish her congratulations, surely gave me that feeling.

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Covid-19

An unprecedented graduation

Posted

On Friday (May 15) evening, I quickly got the feeling that we are living in unprecedented times. What we're going through, this whole pandemic and all, is something we've never seen before.

And watching my sister in her cap and gown, in the front yard of my parents' home in Albuquerque, waving at drivers in the cars who drove by to wish her congratulations, surely gave me that feeling.

But, at the same time, watching my sister have a drive-by graduation was better than watching no graduation -- and because of how her graduation unraveled, it is something she's going to remember forever.

My mother had put together an invitation to have a drive-by graduation for my sister, Trinity Narvaiz, who graduated from Albuquerque Talent Development Academy, a small charter school on Albuquerque's west side of town.

Friends and family came, and those from my parents' home church, too. They honked, loudly, and didn't let down. Why would they? She deserved it, after all.

Trinity, in her blue cap and gown, waved at cars that passed by. The smile on her face was genuine.

In one car, a small white Hyundai Elantra, my Grandma T -- my mom's mom -- my grandma Gloria -- my dad's mom -- and my auntie Stella had greeted Trinity with masks. In what world was this ever going to be a scenario? Both of my grandmas are elderly, yet they made the voyage to let Trinity understand just how important this moment was -- the graduating part.

In another car, Ernie and Rosemary -- an elderly couple who met at Blake's Lotaburger over 50 years ago and who have been going to church with my family in Albuquerque for as long as I can remember -- came to honor Trinity as well.

We had my Tío Feo, or uncle Freddy as some know him, and my auntie Kathy and their family come by in their cars.

Friends of my parents and even their pastors came by and honked for Trinity, or Trinner, as my mom calls her.

Trinity's best friend, Blanca, was in her car as well and both cried when she pulled up. They both graduated this year and, when they shared those tears, one thing was clear between the two -- that they're finally here now. Graduates of 2020.

Sometimes columns are just big rambles - and right now this one, to be frank, is a big ramble. I guess what I'm trying to angle at is that this is an unusual time. And lately, days have started to feel different.

But as abnormal as a drive-by graduation would have seemed just a couple of months ago, it is the new normal. There's nothing unusual about that now.

With friends and family still there to honor such a momentous achievement, graduation won't be remembered by my sister Trinity for the circumstances surrounding it, but for the authenticity of what coming together can truly entail.

And that's what I hope it can be for all who are graduating in this unusual time as well.

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