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In January 2020, a chunk of the north adobe wall inside the historic Kit Carson Home and Museum in Taos collapsed into a pile of rubble.

The collapsed wall became one more reason the Freemasons of Bent Lodge No. 42 - which actually owns the property - wants to part ways and break its lease with the Kit Carson Home and Museum.

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Horse Thief Shorty is a well-known character described by Taos historian, activist, storyteller and river-running guru Cisco Guevara. Among other things, Guevara said the rapid named Horse Thief Shorty on the Middle Box of the Río Grande in La Junta area was the approximate location of a secret cable crossing and nearby cabin of Shorty’s, allowing him to sell horses on one side of the river and then steal them back overnight, changing their “spots” and selling them again on the opposite side of the river. Everybody also knew Shorty because he supplied most restaurants with game and fish.

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Sitting down in front of a lump of clay is like a painter with a full palette in front of a blank canvas or a composer sitting before a piano anticipating the exact moment when a key is struck. It’s picturing the shape that lies as imminent potential, a tactile birth of something that hasn’t yet existed.

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They left their marriages, cut their hair, severed ties with their families and even abandoned their children.

They craved freedom - emancipation of the body and mind.

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ROOM 102 IN THE HISTORIC TAOS INN, on 125 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, is special. One of 45 unique guest rooms, this one room has a silver Nambé star on its door. It was the room reserved for Washington, D.C., writer Dee Strasberg every spring and fall, starting in 1951, until failing health kept her away.

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Born in Albuquerque and raised in Peñasco, Juniper Manley has lived in Taos for the past 19 years. She is currently the acting steward of the …

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Christy Schoedinger Coleman, the recently appointed executive director of the Taos Art Museum at the Fechin House Morgan Timms / Taos News

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Davison Koenig, the Couse-Sharp Historic Site executive director and curator Courtesy

To some it may seem inexplicable why Taos--a tiny town nestled in New Mexico’s high mountain desert--became the vortex for an American art movement of such national and international significance over the course of a century.  But to Davison Koenig, the Couse-Sharp Historic Site executive director and curator, it’s perfectly understandable.