Search / 548 results found

from
to
  • Updated

There have always been as many reasons people come to Taos as there are people coming to Taos, according to Dee Doubleday, Qualifying Broker and owner of Mariposa Realty of Taos, but at this exceptional moment, one particular impulse helps explain the dramatic increase in enthusiasm for our area. “Now’s the time to reconnect with our world,” Dee said. “There’s no better place to find that connection than Taos.” Newcomers to Taos soon become whole again by reestablishing a bond with any or all of these seven stand-out attributes.

  • Updated

When I was approached to do a commemorative issue, reflecting on a year of the COVID-19 pandemic, my first impulse was to write about a year spent in my pajamas, working from home, but in all seriousness, this year has taken a terrible toll on all of us, whether we spent it working in our pajamas or wearing PPE.

  • Updated

It was the first day of spring 2021 and the folks at Red Willow Farm helped celebrate by giving out a free meal to Taos Pueblo tribal members. The tasty meal of meatloaf, corn and squash casserole, and bizcochitos were prepared at the Taos County Economic Development Corporation's community kitchen at the corner of Bertha Street and Salazar Road in Taos.

  • Updated

New Taos Pueblo officials for 2021 have been announced by the tribe. Clyde M. Romero Sr. will serve as Governor and Fred L. Romero has been named the tribe's War Chief, according to official announcements from their respective tribal offices.

  • Updated

As a wide variety of art and artisans to choose from. One could find among the many shops of Taos Pueblo, anything, from a Robert Mirabal CD to custom-made silver and turquoise jewelry. Yet, today, Taos Pueblo borders have been shut down for nearly a year, and some Taos Pueblo artists are taking to digital and social media to promote their work.Following are just a few of the many artisans and artists from Taos Pueblo.

  • Updated

A tribal member’s open letter to the community about holiday trees, feasting and prayers for world peace, healing and unity of leadership

  • Updated

When Taos Pueblo elder Eloisa Bernal Apachito passed away Oct. 10, she left behind a legacy of strength, resilience and hope.

Commonly known as “Aunt Elsie,” Apachito was born Feb. 20, 1918, to Joe and Merina Romero Bernal, just two years after the United States government, at the direction of President Theodore Roosevelt, took possession of Blue Lake, the tribe’s most sacred site, as part of the newly established Kit Carson National Forest.