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In 2009, Agnes Chavez had been a successful studio artist and metal sculptor for 15 years. Then she had a collaborative epiphany. "I discovered projection art, and I fell in love with it. I was always using art for humanitarian purposes, but with this I come up with the concept, and I collaborate with others," said Chavez.

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The current back and forth on traffic flow through town is somewhat amusing. But only somewhat.

What we should be talking about is comprehensive traffic planning and that includes traffic reduction. Taos must create a network of properly designed sidewalks and dedicated, protected bike routes. We need more crosswalks; we need better designed streets...

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At the crossroads of science, art and activism stands a red-haired Taoseña artist named Gwendolyn Pieper. Always active in her community, and fresh home from recently graduating from Cornell, Pieper recently started a new project in Taos.

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In the beginning of the pandemic Twirl was invited by Tempo editor Lynne Robinson to produce a weekly column for the Tempo. We called it At Home with Twirl and Friends. In response to the COVID-19 crisis, we were going for a cozy and supportive Mr. Rogers feeling, asking contributors to share support, inspiration, resources and creativity to get through these hard times. Thanks to all our wonderful Friends we now have a rich archive of columns reflecting the resourcefulness and creativity of our Taos community. Visit twirltaos.org/articles, to see what our Friends shared.

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Kristina Ortez said she distinctly remembers the moment when she decided to run for office. It was 2019. She was at a gathering focused on attracting more women to run for political office. One of the speakers was Linda Calhoun, Red River's mayor. "I remember her clearly saying one, talk to your family about it, and two, run a kind, clean campaign. That really struck me. I thought she had a lot of integrity."

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The Pollinator Concentrator project started in 2019, inspired by a conversation between Juniper Manley, director of the Harwood Museum, who was working there at the time, and Kristina Ortez, the executive director at the Taos Land Trust. The conversation they had led to Agnes Chavez being invited to submit a proposal for an art installation and STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and math) program at the Río Fernando Park.