Search / 162 results found

from
to
  • Updated

For years it has sat on the side of State Road 68, just south of Taos. At times it has tempted passers-by with its promise of relaxation on th…

  • Updated

Longtime Taoseños will remember that many years ago there was a simple log bridge that crossed the Red River, connecting the Cebolla Mesa Trail with the Wild Rivers area near Questa. But in 2006 the bridge was washed out, and for 15 years there was no connection between the two areas.

  • Updated

On May 9, protected by neoprene, I bobbed around in a flooded canyon in Utah’s Lake Powell. The reservoir had fallen below 35 percent full, which gave me the unique opportunity to free-dive through an underwater bridge that was now suddenly within reach.

  • Updated

Since 1998, I have often written to the Forest Service and the Taos News about the serious losses of water quality and quantity I have witnessed on the upper Río Fernando. I believe those losses were caused by the intensive federal grazing that has been scheduled there every year for decades.

Another serious problem is the failure of the Forest Service to require the permittees to keep the range facility (fences, gates and watering troughs) in working condition. These improvements were originally...

  • Updated

Now that we seem to have the COVID-19 pandemic somewhat under control, at least here in the United States, one question that remains is how and when we should return to our normal lives.

  • Updated

Of the three million river miles that wind and weave throughout the U.S., less than 13,000 miles have been designated by the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968, with having outstanding natural, cultural and recreational values. The Río Grande in Northern New Mexico is one of them.

The Native Tewa people whose powerful deity Avanyu protects the Río Grande, will tell you that the sacred river and the surrounding landscape act as their office and their church. It also acts as their playground.

  • Updated

Everyday, people throw away tons of "stuff." All of this waste not only clogs our landfills and litters our streets, but it also washed into our rivers and oceans, where it can harm wildlife. While the ocean may be 900 miles away, most ocean-bound plastic waste travels through our rivers and tributary systems, putting freshwater habitats at risk as well as marine habitats. Studies suggest that our major rivers and lakes are just as polluted as our oceans.

  • Updated

Some Colorado River tribulations today remind me of a folk story: A young man went to visit his fiancé and found the family trembling and weeping. They pointed to the ceiling, where an axe was embedded in a rafter.

"That could fall," the father quavered. "It could kill someone!"

Puzzled, the young man climbed onto a chair, and pulled the axe out of the rafter. Everyone fell all over themselves thanking him. But he quickly broke off the engagement, concerned that such inanity might be inheritable.