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Taos County saw a 29 percent decrease in its COVID-19 case rate (cases per 100,000 people per week) from the previous week. In New Mexico, cases were down two percent, while nationally, cases were down nine percent during the same time period.

Taos County reported 56 new cases of COVID-19 from Oct. 5 – Oct. 11, compared to 32 new cases the week before, according to town of Taos GIS Analyst Tim Corner. The total number of cases in the …

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COVID-19 is still hitting Taos hard. The county saw a 45-percent increase in its COVID-19 case rate (cases per 100,000 people per week) from the previous week. In New Mexico, cases were up 6 percent, while nationally, cases were down 14 percent during the same time period.

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Taos County saw a 40 percent decline in its COVID-19 case rate (cases per 100,000 people per week) from the previous week. In New Mexico, cases were up 4 percent, while nationally cases were down 12 percent during the same time period.

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Taos County saw a 10 percent drop in COVID-19 cases between August 2 and August 8, while the state overall experienced a 72 percent increase and cases nationwide rose by 36 percent, according to town of Taos GIS Analyst Tim Corner.

Taos County is currently one of two counties in New Mexico that have "moderate transmission" COVID rates, according to classification by the CDC. However, with the recently counted cases Taos County will be classified as a county with substantial transmission.

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The COVID-19 case rate (cases per 100,000 people per week) increased by 48 percent across New Mexico between July 7-12, according to the town of Taos, which referenced data from the New Mexico Department of Health and Johns Hopkins University.

The case rate increase in Taos County from the previous week was nearly three-fold, jumping from 34 to 92. The county case rate had peaked in November 2020 at 627 cases per 100,000 people per week.

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Even as the pandemic has taken a turn for the less-severe this year - with vaccination rates rising and economies beginning to show signs of recovery - mental health professionals throughout the world have seen clear indicators of a coming psychosocial crisis. One of their biggest concerns is how this problem impacts our kids, who had even fewer outlets to vent their pandemic-related anxieties than adults did.