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Taos renaissance man Ralph Waldo Emerson Meyers (1885-1948) is a "true Taos character" according to Gabriel Abrums, owner of Chimayo Trading Del Norte in the Saint Francis Plaza.

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Award-winning artist, Michelle Tsosie Sisneros of Santa Clara, Navajo and Laguna tribes, paints traditional Native American themes with bold abstract elements and surrealist influences. She is the niece of Pablita Velarde - the grandmother of flat Navajo painting who may be the most famous female painter in Navajo history.

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Approximately 10 years ago a couple of friends who share a love of painting outdoors started meeting once a week to paint and enjoy the experience together. Each week an additional plein air enthusiast joined. Within a short amount of time, the Taos Plein Air Painters were born and the informal group committed to a weekly painting session. They've only grown from there.

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When Tempo introduced Mark Maggiori to our readers recently, we exposed but a fraction of this French ex-pat’s proverbial iceberg. We heard about his first road trip across America at age 15 (with the same uncle who later encouraged him to study at the Academie Julien in Paris) and his arrival here in Taos, but there is so much more to discover beneath the surface of things where Maggiori is concerned.

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'Spring drew on ... and a greenness grew over those brown beds, which, freshening daily, suggested the thought that hope traversed them at night and left each morning brighter traces of her steps."

-Charlotte Brontë

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Sam Deuel is an award-winning artist who is inspired by his travels and family, and especially the Paleolithic era and "the marks cave painters left on the world," he says.

From a family of artists, who have had a reputation as significant contributors to the art world since the 1950s, Deuel grew up in an art-driven environment, surrounded by beautiful paintings and sculpture, and was encouraged to create from a young age.

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Horse Thief Shorty is a well-known character described by Taos historian, activist, storyteller and river-running guru Cisco Guevara. Among other things, Guevara said the rapid named Horse Thief Shorty on the Middle Box of the Río Grande in La Junta area was the approximate location of a secret cable crossing and nearby cabin of Shorty’s, allowing him to sell horses on one side of the river and then steal them back overnight, changing their “spots” and selling them again on the opposite side of the river. Everybody also knew Shorty because he supplied most restaurants with game and fish.

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Sitting down in front of a lump of clay is like a painter with a full palette in front of a blank canvas or a composer sitting before a piano anticipating the exact moment when a key is struck. It’s picturing the shape that lies as imminent potential, a tactile birth of something that hasn’t yet existed.