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It had been a quiet evening out in the desert. Ole Johnny Mudd had been driving his cattle all day long, hoping to get them over to the Santa Fe Trail by morning. Night had fallen and the stars glittered in the sky and the full moon shed its light over the entire place.

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“I’ve been working with mustangs since I was 8,” Sunny Khalsa says, "When I was a girl there was a small herd of mustangs that people called the 'Jicarilla herd.' We’d occasionally see them when hiking the Truchas peaks and as far down as La Puebla along the Chimayo river.”

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The wild horses that live on Wild Horse Mesa north of the Village of Questa still run free, in part, due to the efforts of one woman who has made it her mission to protect them and ensure they don't die out in New Mexico's ongoing drought

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As he rode the entire length of his big range, Ole Johnny Mudd tried to figure out a way deal with the desperate situation. He sung a little melody as he rode along, trying to think of how to fix the problem.

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After more than a year, Equine Spirit Sanctuary is finally open to the public. The horses are brushed and literally chomping at the bit. The trainers are on their toes. Now all they need are some people to do some riding.

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One beautiful morning, Ole Johnny Mudd went to see his friend Socololito. He was a Native who, like many Indians, lived in an adobe house. The houses were built one above the next all the way to the height of five stories. Many families lived together for protection from invaders. They used to call this unity of houses "The Red Village" because at sunset, the door frames of the adobe houses seemed to turn very red. Socololito was sitting on the roof of his home enjoying the daily sun. When Ole Johnny Mudd got there, Socololito was already waiting for him.

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One beautiful morning, Ole Johnny Mudd went to see his friend Socololito. He was a Native who, like many Indians, lived in an adobe house. The houses were built one above the next all the way to the height of five stories. Many families lived together for protection from invaders. They used to call this unity of houses "The Red Village," because at sunset, the door frames of the adobe houses seemed to turn very red. Socololito was sitting on the roof of his home enjoying the daily sun. When Ole Johnny Mudd got there, Socololito was already waiting for him.

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Haven Lindsey recently moved to Taos from Austin, Texas. The COVID pandemic has lately swelled our ranks up here in the previously, rather hidden, valley. One soon discovers, however, the people attracted to Taos are always the most interesting, accomplished, eccentric and bohemian characters, and Lindsay is no exception, A well-traveled writer, a lover of animals and children, the relationship she observed between her dog, Gracie, and a horse they befriended named Max, inspired her to write this little book - a way for children to discover the joy of bonding with animals - their pets, and others.