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DEADLINE AUG 1: Teachers that owe student loans could receive up to $6,000 a year to help pay them off, thanks to the Teacher Loan Repayment Program at the New Mexico Higher Education Department.

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Teachers, students and all music lovers, won't want to miss this exciting opportunity that will revolutionize how you see the history of music.

Experience the roots of some of this country's greatest music across every medium, from blues, jazz, folk, pop, rock, heavy metal and more.

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Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham on Monday (April 5) autographed 50 bills - including several related to public education and child well-being - in a flurry of signings that turn a vast array of legislation into law.

Among the high-profile bills the governor signed were Senate Bill 32, which enacts a ban on trapping on public lands, and Senate Bill 84, which will allow residents and business owners to access solar power as communities.

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New Mexico schools will receive $979 million in federal aid to help them fully reopen in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The New Mexico Public Education Department will allocate 90 percent of the funding to individual school districts and state charter schools.

The remaining 10 percent will fund interventions to address learning loss, summer-enrichment and after-school programs, accelerated instruction, efforts to close the digital divide and support for disabled and at-risk students.

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In what is becoming a growing list of surprising reversals, the New Mexico Public Education Department announced Thursday (March 4) night that spectators will be allowed to attend school-related sports, effective immediately.

The only limitations are those outlined in the state's public health order that call for the use of its color-coded system to identify the COVID-19 health risks in each county.

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The New Mexico Public Education Department faced fierce backlash in recent weeks after announcing its decision to pair in-person school learning with participation in high school sports. The decision meant that students in larger counties, with higher positivity rates (and therefore less likelihood of in-person learning) would be less likely to get a sports season.

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Living in Philadelphia is a touchy subject if you're in charge of the public schools in New Mexico.

Ryan Stewart, Cabinet secretary of the Public Education Department, upset more than a few politicians, parents and grandparents last year when he worked remotely from Philadelphia for several months.