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Old school fairy tales and even some children’s songs from a few generations back came under attack by contemporary child welfare advocates fo…

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The documentary film by Jerry Rothwell, titled “The Reason I Jump,” makes a compelling case for the need to understand what goes on inside the minds of some nonspeaking autistic people.

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Taking in the world from above fills Chris Dahl-Bredine’s heart with hope and opens his mind to think big.

He loves to impart what it’s like to experience the breathtaking beauty of the Four Corners region from the open cockpit of his ultralight aircraft, but words alone aren’t enough to properly convey the feelings of freedom and awe.

It’s through his incredible images that the 52-year-old, Taos-based aerial photographer shares the rarefied air he inhabits in the early mornings and late afternoons, when the skies are their calmest and the landscapes adorned in the most brilliant light.

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Although director Christopher Nolan’s “Tenet” is one of the more fascinating films to come along in a while and is probably best seen in a movie theater for the ultimate experience, in some ways the fact we can see it via streaming services so we can stop and rewind makes it a bit easier to understand. However, when I first saw it on Vudu, I watched it straight through and then for the sake of this review I rewatched it for the rewinds.

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George Clooney’s film is inspired by a 2016 dystopian novel titled “Good Morning, Midnight” by Lily Brooks-Dalton. He stars as an esteemed astronomer named Dr. Augustine Lofthouse, who has spent his entire career exploring the stars with telescopes. In Mark L. Smith’s adaptation of Dalton’s book, that search results in a horrifying realization. 

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It's been a strange year for the movies in 2020. When the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic hit, one of the first industries to feel its wrath were the movie theaters. Gone were the days when screening rooms were packed at opening night showings. No more jockeying for the best seats. No more scooting down the aisle, arms loaded with sodas, popcorn and Twizzlers. Then, the lights go down. Someone says shhh (usually me). And then the trailers start …

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There are few holiday-themed movies that continue to resonate as much as Frank Capra’s 1946 black-and-white masterpiece, “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Interestingly, its longevity doesn’t have to do with the kind of overwrought fantasy sentiment found in many films from the post-World War II era. Instead, if watched closely, you’ll note that it is very much a work of art.