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The front windows of the old police station on Civic Plaza Drive are transformed into an art destination every month by The Annex Window Series fueled by the Paseo Project. Beginning in September …

For those whose families have lived in Taos for generations, and for those who have more recently chosen to call Taos their home, there is an intrinsic understanding of the many ways history …

Tucked away in plain sight in the historic 1948 Howell Building on Kit Carson Road, you’ll find Bryans Gallery. Home to authentic Southwestern Native American arts and jewelry, Bryan Steger opened …

When Taos Clay in El Prado closed, a core of local artists were left without communal studio space and a supplier of the materials necessary for their craft. It was fortunate, indeed, there was a …

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2022-2023 Taos Gallery Guide. Your source for artists, galleries, and museums. In this year's guide, we go behind the scenes with Jana Greiner, the curator for The Annex Window Series fueled by Paseo Project. Learn how local artists transform the front windows of the old Taos police station on Civic Plaza Drive into a beautiful art destination.

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Stroll through Wilder Nightingale Fine Art Gallery on Kit Carson Road in Taos and you’ll discover multiple rooms of artwork ranging in every size, style and price imaginable. Walls and easels present an exquisite collection of original oils, pastels and watercolors depicting the people, flora and fauna of these regional landscapes. Peggy Immel, Stephen Day and Peggy Trigg are just some of the well-known artists with work on display. 

 

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Growing up in Taos, Noelle Kalom left after graduating from Taos High, and never looked back. She spent 16 years in NYC cutting creative teeth in Guerilla Street Theater and making art in her Brooklyn studio, before returning to Santa Fe where she met and married jeweler and artist,  Wave Redfish, a Lakota Native.

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When Moriah Stanton feels a "yes" -- the sacred kind, the kind that roots deep in the gut and begs to flower -- she follows it. Like 15 years ago when she was in living it up hot on the hospitality scene in the Hampton's, but was one day walking on the beach and had the maybe-crazy thought, 'I need to quit everything and go live with my dad.' 

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The Vallecitos, New Mexico artist Afton Love said her family name comes from a long line of “many Loves.” Afton is a coincidence between my parents. My grandfather on my mom’s side was born in Afton, Wyoming. My great grandmother and lots of great, great great aunts on my dad’s side are named Afton. Their heritage is Scottish and there is a river in Scotland called Afton that they named the ladies after. 

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Pandemonium struck in spring of 2020, just as Taos’ Gallery Guide was going to press.  It had promised to be an exciting year for the crown jewel museums of Taos: Couse-Sharp Historic Site; Harwood Museum of Art; Millicent Rogers Museum; Taos Art Museum at Fechin House; and Taos Historic Museums. Notable exhibitions and big dreams were in the works for 2020, with each organization under the direction of passionately dedicated executive directors.

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'This past year has been huge for me," Nikesha Breeze says. "Not just with the lockdowns and relative home isolation. Breeze is the mother of two teenage sons, one of whom just won a national scholarship competition and was awarded a full-ride four-year all-inclusive scholarship to the University of Chicago, but with all the uprisings around the world for Black Lives Matter and social justice, both of which I've been deeply engaged with."

There are dozens of art galleries in Taos, but women-owned galleries are still rare. Maye Torres and Georgia Gersh are two women who grew up in Taos art circles, one the daughter of a gallery owner and the other the daughter of a famous artist. Both are artists themselves, and both now have galleries that have become essential resources for the Taos arts community.

Larry Bell is a renowned contemporary American artist, best known for his glass cubes and large-scale sculpture. Born in Chicago in 1959 he mostly grew up in Los Angeles, where he studied at the Chouinard Art Institute (now part of CalArts), with the intention of becoming a Disney animator. It was at Chouinard where Bell was introduced to abstract art.

Tom Dixon is one of Taos’ best kept secrets, but not for much longer. An incredibly disciplined painter, totally committed to his process as an artist. After studying at the Art Institute in Chicago he came here and began to work. He has lived and worked in the same place now for three decades, and when Larry Bell was asked to recommend artists whose studios we should visit and cover for this year’s edition of the Gallery Guide, Tom Dixon was at the top of his list.

Izumi Yokoyama and Theresa Gray belong to the continuum of artists who have followed the call to come to the High Desert since Bert Phillips and Ernest Blumenschein’s wagon wheel broke, stranding the two young East Coast artists in Taos. That was a century ago, and the stream of artists that arrive in Taos and stay, remains steady.

Izumi Yokoyama and Theresa Gray belong to the continuum of artists who have followed the call to come to the High Desert since Bert Phillips and Ernest Blumenschein’s wagon wheel broke, stranding the two young East Coast artists in Taos. That was a century ago, and the stream of artists that arrive in Taos and stay, remains steady.

To some it may seem inexplicable why Taos--a tiny town nestled in New Mexico’s high mountain desert--became the vortex for an American art movement of such national and international significance over the course of a century.  But to Davison Koenig, the Couse-Sharp Historic Site executive director and curator, it’s perfectly understandable.

 
 
 
 
 
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