Struggling with scant provisions through the rugged Taos wilderness, a 19-year-old Kentucky fur trapper and his Black servant wondered if they would ever reach American civilization alive after being freed in 1819 from imprisonment in Santa Fe.

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It was a typical spring day in 1950 for a fire tower operator in New Mexico’s Capitan Mountains in Lincoln National Forest near Alamogordo. Then everything changed. He spotted smoke wafting …

Whether it be an 1865 murder gone unpunished; a young fur trapper captured by Mexican troops, in-prisoned and then banished only to return to New Mexico as a territorial governor; a pair of seemingly out-of-place stone pillars with possible ties to the Knights Templar...

Northern New Mexico pioneer Ceran St. Vrain was a leader of his time. Those who lived and worked with St. Vrain said he was a kind gentleman, a worthy and intelligent commander — polite but, …

If only the tombstones at Kit Carson Cemetery could talk, Taos area residents might be able to solve a mystery that has contributed to the collection of local folklore. 

Ask an ordinary Catholic around the world to name the first book of the Bible and he’s likely to say, “Genesis; the story of Creation.” Now, ask an ordinary Taoseño to name …

The Taos Pueblo Council met to decide what to do with the strange white man who spent so many hours sitting on the bank of the river in their village. What was he doing there? What was he putting on …

¿Paradise Lost? is an excerpt of an article that first appeared in Hakol, the news magazine of the Taos Jewish Center.

Tales of the Taos Plaza Theater is excerpted from “Those Were the Days,” a memoir by Phaedra Greenwood and Jim Levy about life and love in Taos in the 1970s.

The mid-1700s brought Spain face to face with all the challenges of controlling its frontier empire in the Americas from the natives — especially in Nuevo Mexico. The Pueblo Revolt of 1680 …

O.E. Pattison left his mark on the Taos Ski Valley long before the first skier arrived. A loop road bears his name. His family still owns more than 1,200 acres in the high country that includes …

Many cultures around the world teach stories of creation. These are traditional tales of just how a people came to be formed by the gods.

The following piece is an excerpt from the chapter “Crack of thunder, first drops of rain” in Jim Levy’s memoir, “Rowdy’s Boy,” about his childhood and adolescence. To get from Los Angeles to Taos, my mother took Route 66, driven in the blazing heat of five summers, 1948-‘52, east in June and back again in August, the first time in a green Hudson when our mother was 40, Bunny was 9, I was 7 and infant Mary.

On July 3, 1929, the bloated, fly- and maggot-infested, headless corpse of 70-year-old Arthur Rochford Manby (allegedly the body of Manby, that is) was discovered by two lawmen on a cot in his …

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Long before people settled North America and centuries before Taos Pueblo had its own herd, millions of bison once roamed the grasslands of the American West.     Weighing up to …

Larger than life The stuff that legends are made of In your hands is the 16th annual installment of Tradiciones. From past to present, this special publication continues to be a recognition and …

 
 
 
 
 
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