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Out of the mouths of former hippy babes comes this history of Fountain of Light, the monthly counterculture tabloid published in Taos from 1969-1970. Jim Levy, editor for the last three issues, and author/journalist Phaedra Greenwood talk a little about the people who founded and worked on this now-legendary review.

— Tradiciones editor Virginia L. Clark

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New Mexico’s Most Popular Public Official Succumbed to Pneumonia Which Resulted from Influenza,” read the top of the New Mexico State Register on Oct. 18, 1918. Just below, another headline read: “Influenza Spreading Rapidly Over Country.” Yet another headline stated that “Every School in the State Has Been Closed on Account of the Epidemic Previous to the Governor's Proclamation,” with the article also noting that they had converted a Valencia County high school into a hospital for handling the new influx of influenza cases.

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Twenty years ago, in Y2K, the Taos News published its first Tradiciónes, an annual special section honoring Taos times, customs and cultures in four weekly installments. The first of the series is Leyendas (the Spanish word for legends), storied events both real and imagined, yet so momentous as to change the fabric of our history forever. Inside Leyendas, we look at the 50-year battle for the return of Taos Pueblo's Sacred Blue Lake — a feat finally establishing self-determination of Am…

Struggling with scant provisions through the rugged Taos wilderness, a 19-year-old Kentucky fur trapper and his Black servant wondered if they would ever reach American civilization alive after being freed in 1819 from imprisonment in Santa Fe.

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It was a typical spring day in 1950 for a fire tower operator in New Mexico’s Capitan Mountains in Lincoln National Forest near Alamogordo. Then everything changed. He spotted smoke wafting …

Whether it be an 1865 murder gone unpunished; a young fur trapper captured by Mexican troops, in-prisoned and then banished only to return to New Mexico as a territorial governor; a pair of seemingly out-of-place stone pillars with possible ties to the Knights Templar...

Northern New Mexico pioneer Ceran St. Vrain was a leader of his time. Those who lived and worked with St. Vrain said he was a kind gentleman, a worthy and intelligent commander — polite but, …

If only the tombstones at Kit Carson Cemetery could talk, Taos area residents might be able to solve a mystery that has contributed to the collection of local folklore. 

Ask an ordinary Catholic around the world to name the first book of the Bible and he’s likely to say, “Genesis; the story of Creation.” Now, ask an ordinary Taoseño to name …

The Taos Pueblo Council met to decide what to do with the strange white man who spent so many hours sitting on the bank of the river in their village. What was he doing there? What was he putting on …

¿Paradise Lost? is an excerpt of an article that first appeared in Hakol, the news magazine of the Taos Jewish Center.

Tales of the Taos Plaza Theater is excerpted from “Those Were the Days,” a memoir by Phaedra Greenwood and Jim Levy about life and love in Taos in the 1970s.

The mid-1700s brought Spain face to face with all the challenges of controlling its frontier empire in the Americas from the natives — especially in Nuevo Mexico. The Pueblo Revolt of 1680 …

O.E. Pattison left his mark on the Taos Ski Valley long before the first skier arrived. A loop road bears his name. His family still owns more than 1,200 acres in the high country that includes …

Many cultures around the world teach stories of creation. These are traditional tales of just how a people came to be formed by the gods.

 
 
 
 
 
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