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It is commonly said that anyone wanting to be considered for citizenship in this country should not list his chosen profession as doctor or lawyer because there is already a glut of them in the United States. If an applicant wants to attract the attention of the American immigration bureau though, he should try filing his special talent as ‘sheep herder’ and, there’s a better chance that he will be moved to the top of the list of those being considered. The United States is in dire need …

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It’s a Monday afternoon and a soft chill rides the greying-cloud summer breeze, shuffles through the elm and locust leaves on the Santa Fe Plaza. Tourists bustle in and out of galleries, or relax on the benches set up in the city’s verdant belly button. A man with a white waterfall of a beard strums his guitar while, a few grassy patches down, two Native guys drum and sing loud, releasing ancestors from their throats. Under the Palace of the Governors portal, a line of artisans from diff…

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There are certain places in the world where history and spirituality run together. Places where those who are in tune with such things, can feel their faith manifested in the rocks and trees and sky all around them. These places carry weight in their names and power in their connections to people’s most deeply held beliefs. Many of these places are well known, like Mecca, or the Wailing Wall, or Vatican City. 

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"Sana sana, colita de rana, si no sanas hoy, sanas mañana"

My father 's voice lullabied me as a young girl. The saying translates as, “Heal heal, little frog’s tail, if you don’t heal today, you will heal tomorrow”. When I would fall ill or injured, my father would recite these words to me in an effort to ease my pain. This is the first memory I have introducing me to the traditional ways of healing that took place amongst my family and a majority of Northern New Mexicans. This traditional healing system is known as curanderismo, a centuries-old healing practice influenced by Iberic, Indigenous, and Aztec medicines. Curanderismo is still used today and practiced in San Miguel, Santa Fe, Rio Arriba, and Taos Counties.

If you like to seek out the far-flung and unusual places a region has to offer, you will want to check out these little gems nestled in Northern and Central New Mexico. Check websites or call for hours (which may be limited), admission fees, special events and additional information.

How does a city recover after its primary economic driver pulls out, sending it into a decades-long skid? How does it transform from being a "pass through" city to a destination? How does it overcome economic and social hardships to once again become a vibrant community?

In an area jammed with national and world-caliber parks, monuments and historic sites, here are a few suggestions for places to visit. For details, look online.

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For eons and centuries, New Mexico’s American Indians and Hispano people, respectively, depended heavily on local mountain forests to provide many of the essential elements needed for survival and quality of life.

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The Carson National Forest is embarking on a new and improved relationship with Northern New Mexico’s rural peoples and what it calls “traditional historic communities,” composed largely of Hispanic residents who trace their roots back centuries and Pueblo Indians whose ancestors arrived even earlier.

Ask any Northern New Mexico parciante — an owner of a derecho (water right) that allows them to divert water onto their land through a compuerta (headgate) from an acequia (ditch) — if …

If you give a man a loaf of Pueblo bread, he eats for a day. If you teach a man to make Pueblo bread, he eats for life — or at least as long as he’s in the vicinity of an horno. Here in …

I met Arturo Garrido, an architect from Mexico City, in September 2015. He was attending the Three Trails Conference in Santa Fe, which focused on the convergence in Santa Fe of El Camino Real de …

No public spaces in Northern New Mexico are more reflective of local customs, the skills of homegrown artisans and particular traditions than are churches. In our ongoing look at various means and …

“If I were to go outside and stuff the dirt from this place in my mouth, it would be sweet,” says Anita Otilla Rodríguez. The enjarradora (master mud plasterer), author, painter …

Since Land Water People Time launched in 2014, more than 20 individual artists (including those featured here) have been profiled in the Art Characters series, providing a glimpse into the creative …

New Mexico is a land of trails. High in the mountains are the game trails of elk and deer. At the middle altitudes are the paths that rabbits take and trails left by turkeys in the mud of riverbanks. …

Stepping from the bright Española sunlight into the cool adobe interior of the Chimayó Trading Post is like stepping into a bit of New Mexico history. The trading post — …

Most Sundays, when the weather is good, I take a drive with my mother to Chimayó, our querencia (home ground), the place of origin for so much of who we are. In our conversation as we travel, …

If you’re lucky enough to live in north-central New Mexico, you’re probably already a fan of the great outdoors. Wouldn’t you like to add a new layer to your appreciation of nature …

When my students and I discuss the possibilities of the birth petroglyph with Matthew Martinez, we inevitably weave a web of stories about traditional birth practices, about imagining how and where women gave birth and how birth begs the question of relationship.

 
 
 
 
 
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