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Wake and Take in Arroyo Seco is a healthy, quick-service dining experience, the perfect pit-stop on your way up or down the mountain, with a welcoming vibe and a creative menu that pushes the boundaries of what is possible in a 15-minutes-or-fewer turnaround. 

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“Flavortown,” says Elijah Safford, the 22-year-old head chef/owner of Aceq Restaurant in Arroyo Seco. Yeah, you read that right. Flavortown — a mixture of dried herbs and spices (Chimayo chile, for example, amongst other shush-shush ingredients) that’s like a Louisiana-inspired Cajun blackened seasoning. An umami-vibe base, if you will ...

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From the highway one can see an enigmatic rabbit sign along Stakeout Drive. If you “follow” the white rabbit it leads you to a pristine white building sitting atop Outlaw Hill known as the Stakeout. From their two-tiered wooden deck one can see ...

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During normal times, Aceq owner and Sommelier Michael (“Red”) Wagener, spends as much time on the slopes as he does in his very popular restaurant in Arroyo Seco. And regulars on the slopes can usually be found at Aceq once the sun goes down.

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The restaurant scenes all over the world have been riding the pandemic rollercoaster along with us since March 2020. Those eateries whose doors remain open for business are a tenacious bunch with great menus, superb customer service, and a desire to serve the community with familiar food and provide a respite from the challenges of 2020.

Here are a few of the restaurants. All have pivoted to take out only and remained open and willing to ride the tides of change we’ve all been navigating to serve you the finest food anywhere.

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Housed in what was once the Placitas Chapel, a little Catholic Church built during the 1800’s, The Love Apple is the brainchild of Jen Hart, who grew up here in Taos and cut her restaurateur teeth, managing the highly acclaimed Joseph’s Table, before opening this gem.

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Orlando’s New Mexican Café, at 1114 Don Juan Valdez Lane, opened just short of 25 years ago. Over the years the Taos favorite has served thousands of blue corn enchiladas, chile rellenos, burritos and other culinary delights.

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Career restauranteur Bob Gontram came up with the name for his Taos burger joint 5 Star as a play on words on the coveted stars assigned by judges in the world of fine dining.

A graduate of Cornell’s School of Hotel Administration majoring in food service, Gontram has navigated the trials of the hospitality industry, landing in Taos over a decade ago for golf, hiking and skiing.

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It’s not as easy as it used to be to treat yourself to a good meal.  With the ups and downs of the virus and the 24-hour newsfeed, where to dine out and how seems to be changing rapidly. One relative constant has been the patio. Al fresco dining has proven the safest alternative for getting your foodie fix at your favorite restaurant.

There may be 2,000 miles separating Taos from New York City but there’s an easy way to transport yourself there in spirit, your nose following an aroma redolent of the finest Italian restaurants that the city and Long Island have to offer. And it’s right here in the heart of town.

If you are looking for an elegant and delicious way to warm up, stop by Donabe Asian Kitchen in downtown Taos. The curries and other delights are spicy and sweet enough to heat up the body and soul on a cold winter night.

Taos Diner is a must-do weekly, or more, for locals and sometimes a daily stop during visitors’ stays. This longtime Taos staple has a family atmosphere that welcomes all comers with open arms and “howdy neighbor” camaraderie.

Clad in a perfectly white, traditional chef’s coat and built to breathe black-and-white checkered pants, Executive Chef John Lamendola begins his day in the spotless kitchen at Old Martina’s Hall in between 7:30 and 8 a.m. He sets off on a walk-through to see what he needs to catch up on, what he needs to improve, organize the coolers and keep things fresh. It's a long day. It ends at about 9:30 to 10 p.m., except for being closed on Mondays and the half-day brunch on Sundays from 10 a.m…

 
 
 
 

The commercial property at 210 Paseo del Pueblo Sur has seen its fair share of turnover in the past decade. First, a Chinese restaurant set up shop in the space. Then a Thai restaurant. Briefly it …

As the pandemic has lingered on, forcing adaptations for almost all facets of life, Taos has begun to see its fair share of food carts pop up. What has become a phenomenon in nearly all parts of the …

 
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